Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

February 11, 2020
Newly released results of a survey of 1,900 faculty members by Gallup and Inside Higher Ed found that just 38 percent of respondents strongly agreed that they are treated with respect at work. Another 33 percent agreed less strongly with the statement.
February 7, 2020
The Trump administration has dropped a proposed new form for collecting information from colleges about gifts and contracts from foreign sources. The U.S. Department of Education in September published a notice about the new form to report gifts and contracts of $250,000 or more. The American Council on Education and 29 other higher education groups had argued the proposed information collection went beyond the scope of the law.
February 7, 2020
A federal court on Thursday permanently enjoined a Trump administration policy that would make it easier to impose multiyear bans on the re-entry of college students from other countries.
February 6, 2020
About 6 percent of undergraduate college students in 2015-16 were veterans of the U.S. military, active-duty service members, in the reserves or the National Guard, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics. That number was 7 percent for graduate students. The total amount the federal government spent on military education benefits and aid that year was $14.3 billion, up from $12.1 billion in 2010-11.
February 6, 2020
Financial companies often use data on borrowers' higher education to determine access to credit and the price of consumer financial products. And those education data can lead to redlining, a form of discrimination against borrowers who attended community colleges, historically black colleges and universities, or Hispanic-serving institutions.
February 5, 2020
A new policy brief finds that 29 states currently tie some share of state funding for public colleges to student outcomes, such as graduation rates. Many of these state funding formulas also reward colleges for serving low-income students and students from underrepresented minority groups.
February 5, 2020
Researchers at the Urban Institute used student-level data from Connecticut and Virginia and worked with policy makers in those states to assess their data needs in measuring student outcomes and the performance of colleges.
January 31, 2020
Student loan borrowers who use an income-driven repayment plan -- about 30 percent of all student loan borrowers -- often face confusion and can be at a disadvantage when taking on a home mortgage, according to a new research brief from the Urban Institute.
January 28, 2020
Three Ohio community colleges in 2014 began adopting versions of a student success program from the City University of New York.
January 28, 2020
Located in California's Silicon Valley, San José State University is grappling with one of America's most expensive housing markets. The university today rolled out a "comprehensive housing" solution that includes plans for student, faculty and staff members' housing needs.

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