Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher-ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

May 26, 2016
Becker Professional Education, a subsidiary of DeVry Education Group, this week announced it is buying the Association of Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists for $330 million. The membership association, among other things, provides online and in-person training and credentialing on financial crimes prevention. It offers a widely used certification in the field.
May 25, 2016
The State University of New York at Buffalo has made big gains on its graduation rates, thanks in part to a "Finish in 4" pledge that features real commitments by students and the university alike.
May 25, 2016
Daniel Hamburger, the CEO of DeVry Education Group for the last nine years, left the company on Tuesday. His departure was effective immediately, DeVry, a large for-profit chain, said in a written statement. Lisa Wardell, a longtime member of the company's Board of Directors, is the new CEO.
May 25, 2016
The Century Foundation on Wednesday published a report that is critical of state policies that link funding of public colleges with measures of their performance, such as graduation rates and degree production numbers.
May 24, 2016
This spring 18.3 million students enrolled in college, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, a decline of 1.3 percent compared to last spring. The biggest dips were at four-year institutions in the for-profit sector (down 9.3 percent) and at community colleges (2.8 percent). Enrollments increased slightly at four-year public institutions (0.6 percent) and at four-year privates (0.7 percent). Overall enrollments at public colleges were down by 0.9 percent.
May 20, 2016
The U.S. Department of Education and college financial aid offices need to remove barriers and give more guidance to homeless and foster youth to help them attend and succeed in college, says a new report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office. This group of college students often struggles to pursue college, the GAO said, citing data showing they tend to have lower completion rates.
May 13, 2016
Moody's, the credit ratings agency, this week said it changed its financial outlook to negative for three of the seven public universities in Kansas. This year the state's budget will strip $17.7 million from public higher education, which represents about 3 percent of the universities' total state support. State government is proposing a further cut of 3 percent next year.
May 9, 2016
Education Management Corporation, a large for-profit chain, last week announced layoffs of 200 employees in the online division of its Art Institute of Pittsburgh, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported. The company has struggled with slumping revenue and enrollments in recent years, as well as federal and state lawsuits and investigations.
May 4, 2016
National accreditor ACICS, which faces an existential threat for being too lax with bad actors like Corinthian Colleges, tried to yank its approval of Bristol U, a deeply troubled for-profit. But a judge blocked the accreditor's move.
May 3, 2016
Last week's one-day faculty strike at City College of San Francisco over a contract battle is "credit negative" for the college because it sends a strong signal of resistance to the administration's plan to "reduce costs and maintain structural balance," said Moody's, the credit rating agency, on Monday.


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