Paul Fain

Paul Fain, News Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in September 2011, after a six-year stint covering leadership and finance for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Paul has also worked in higher ed P.R., with Widmeyer Communications, but couldn't stay away from reporting. A former staff writer for C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper in Charlottesville, Va., Paul has written for The New York Times, Washington City Paper and Mother Jones. He's won a few journalism awards, including one for beat reporting from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Paul got hooked on journalism while working too many hours at The Review, the student newspaper at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and a long-suffering fan of the Cincinnati Bengals, Fain plays guitar in a band with more possible names than polished songs.

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Most Recent Articles

October 18, 2017
Ambitious project to create public database of wage data and other information about all postsecondary credentials seeks to help students and employers know more about what's expected in academic and job-training programs.
October 18, 2017
Attorneys general in 18 states have sued the U.S. Department of Education over the Trump administration's move to pause enforcement of the so-called gainful-employment rule, which applies to vocational programs at nonprofit colleges and to all programs at for-profit institutions.
October 17, 2017
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation on Monday released a new curriculum it hopes employers, government and higher education can use to better collaborate on closing the skills gap.
October 17, 2017
Half of all black students who took out federal student loans defaulted in 12 years, according to two analyses of new federal data on student borrowers.
October 16, 2017
The Federal Trade Commission and a group of states last week announced a coordinated law-enforcement action against deceptive student loan debt relief scams. The crackdown so far has featured new cases and a judgment against scammers who allegedly used deception and false promises to reel in more than $95 million in illegal fees in recent years. In some cases, the operations pretended to be affiliated with the government.
October 12, 2017
The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs on Wednesday dropped a controversial plan to suspend an ethics law that prevents its employees from receiving pay or other benefits from for-profit institutions, The Associated Press reported.
October 11, 2017
Small increases in course loads can increase the odds that students will stick with college and eventually graduate, particularly part-time students. That's the central finding of a new report from Civitas Learning, a student success company with a focus on predictive analytics.
October 9, 2017
The U.S. Department of Education is scrutinizing an aspect of the proposed acquisition of Kaplan University by Purdue University, The Washington Post reported Friday. Purdue, however, said the reported potential regulatory problem is not an issue.
October 9, 2017
The Quality Assurance Commons for Higher & Postsecondary Education is a new group that is exploring alternative approaches to accreditation in higher education. With funding from the Lumina Foundation and through the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, the QA Commons last week announced a pilot project to assess higher education programs at 14 institutions around the country.
October 6, 2017
Alexandra Logue, the City University of New York’s former chief academic officer, discusses her new book on Pathways, the system’s ambitious and controversial credit transfer program.

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