Philip G. Altbach

Philip G. Altbach is Monan University Professor and director of the Center for International Higher Education at Boston College. He is author and editor of many books on higher education themes including most recently, Leadership for World-class Universities: Challenges for Developing Countries (Routledge, 2010). He has been Distinguished Scholar Leader of the Fulbright New Century Scholars. His research focuses on research universities, developing countries, the academic profession, and related themes. For more information on Philip Altbach and CIHE visit: www.bc.edu/cihe.

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Most Recent Articles

July 1, 2012
Some observers have argued that distance education and the Internet will fundamentally change the nature of higher education in the coming decades. This is highly debatable for the system as a whole. But for the top tier universities, their traditional missions and the campus-based undergraduate experience is unlikely to change much.
April 5, 2012
The United States is truly moving into the era of the commercialization of international higher education. International students, particularly, are being seen as “cash cows” that can bring in needed revenues at a time of austerity.
March 25, 2012
With persistent pressure for increasing income entrepreneurial universities may pounce on any new market niche if it promises potential students. Domestic branch campuses are yet another element in the increasing commercialization of higher education.   
February 19, 2012
Observers note that there is increased scrutiny of foreign academic initiatives in China. There has been some dissatisfaction with unfulfilled promises and poor quality by some foreign providers. Municipal and provincial authorities, often enthusiastically luring foreign institutions, sometimes turn a blind eye to issues of quality, and it is possible that corrupt practices might be involved. 
January 15, 2012
Established indexed journals have been inundated by submissions and many journals accept as few as 10%. Universities increasingly demand more publications as conditions for promotion, salary increases, or even job security. As a result, the large majority of submissions must seek alternative publication outlets. After all, being published somewhere is better than not be published at all. 
December 25, 2011
Despite a new bill headed for parliament, the regulatory framework for permitting overseas institutions to operate in India seems as murky as ever. Observers, inside and out of India, will watch with interest the next steps of this seemingly unending an confusing saga.
November 9, 2011
Recent research concerning higher education in the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, China, India) reflects as many differences as there are in economic models and cultures But one similarity among these emerging economic powerhouses is the urgent need to improve academic culture. All four countries aspire to being recognized as home to world-class research-focused universities, but this class of institution requires a vibrant, merit-based academic culture.
November 4, 2011
What can India learn from American higher education? Not much, writes Philip G. Altbach.
September 27, 2011
The British government recently tightened up visa regulations for international students. Australia is backing and forthing in an attempt to define appropriate visa regulations. More stringent scrutiny of applicants for student visas inevitably risks a decline in the number of incoming international students. The British Home Office predicts that the measures will result in 52,000 fewer visas/year being issued to international students—a net reduction of 260,000 during the next five years.
September 7, 2011
A recent OECD report on doctoral education points to an oversupply in some countries—mainly in North America and Europe. The report notes that many PhD holders cannot find academic jobs and that perhaps there is an overproduction of doctorates. It is useful to have global attention paid to doctoral education, which has expanded significantly in recent years, but largely without planning or coordination in most countries.

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