Philip G. Altbach

Philip G. Altbach is research professor and the founding director of the Center for International Higher Education. He was the Monan University Professor at Boston College for two decades. He has held appointments at Harvard University, the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and the State University of New York at Buffalo and has been a visiting scholar at Stanford University and the University of California at Berkeley. He was Distinguished Scholar Leader of the Fulbright New Century Scholars Program and was Fulbright Research Professor at the University of Mumbai, India. He is a Fellow of the American Education Research Association and was given the Houlihan Award by NAFSA: Association of International Educators and the Howard Bowen Research Award by the Association for the Study of Higher Education. He has been appointed to honorary professorships by the National Research University–Higher School of Economics in Moscow, Russia, and Peking University and Xiamen Universities in China and has been Onwell Fellow at the University of Hong Kong. Philip Altbach has written or edited more than 50 books. He has served as editor of the Review of Higher Education and the Comparative Education Review.
 

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Most Recent Articles

November 4, 2011
What can India learn from American higher education? Not much, writes Philip G. Altbach.
September 27, 2011
The British government recently tightened up visa regulations for international students. Australia is backing and forthing in an attempt to define appropriate visa regulations. More stringent scrutiny of applicants for student visas inevitably risks a decline in the number of incoming international students. The British Home Office predicts that the measures will result in 52,000 fewer visas/year being issued to international students—a net reduction of 260,000 during the next five years.
September 7, 2011
A recent OECD report on doctoral education points to an oversupply in some countries—mainly in North America and Europe. The report notes that many PhD holders cannot find academic jobs and that perhaps there is an overproduction of doctorates. It is useful to have global attention paid to doctoral education, which has expanded significantly in recent years, but largely without planning or coordination in most countries.
August 9, 2011
An alarming story from India illustrates the continuing and unending problems monitoring the activities of agents and recruiters working in developing countries for colleges and universities in the United States and elsewhere. The head of the largest international student recruitment company in the Indian state of Punjab was recently arrested on a multiplicity of charges, including embezzlement (of more than $1 million) and forgery.
July 15, 2011
The outposts being created around the world are vulnerable in many ways, writes Philip G. Altbach.
July 5, 2011
 A conference in Toronto last month focused on higher education and the media. Organized by the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations and other groups, the event considered how information about higher education is communicated—we don’t often think about how higher education is portrayed to the public and to policymakers, or for that matter even how the academic community learns about what is going on in the ever more complex world of higher education.
April 25, 2011
 In recent months there have been reports from several countries hinting at a trend towards tightening up visa requirements for international students. The notable current examples are Australia and in April, the UK announced the implementation of new restrictions. The United States implemented dramatically new visa restrictions after 9/11 but has since loosened them significantly. Are these restrictions unfair to students or damaging to higher education? In a word, no.
February 21, 2011
If it were not so serious, it would be laughable. An American ‘sham university’ enrolled more than 1,500 students from India and enabled them to obtain American visas. The fact that they were not studying at the university, nor even residing anywhere near the place, was eventually discovered by US authorities, who started cracking down on the students. The story is reported in the February 2, 2011 issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education.
December 11, 2010
India faces a severe shortage of teaching staff as it rapidly expands it higher education system. At such top institutions as the Indian Institutes of Technology and the Indian Institutes of Management, the generation of academics who matured with these schools is now retiring and there isn’t another cohort in the pipeline to take their places. Similarly, there are shortages of well-qualified staff in departments as most Indian universities responsible for graduate (post-graduate) degrees.

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