Rosalie Arcala Hall

Rosalie Arcala Hall is a Professor of Political Science at the University of the Philippines Visayas in picturesque Miagao, Iloilo. She finished her Ph.D. in Public and International Affairs at Northeastern University (Boston, MA) in 2002. Rosalie and her husband, Bruce, an American, have lived in Tokyo, Japan; Innsbruck, Austria and Chicago, USA in line with research fellowships she received.

Rosalie has also conducted research on post-conflict civil-military relations in the Aceh, Indonesia; Dili, EastTimor; and Mindanao,Philippines. She is currently working on research projects with American and European collaborators on military mergers; asymmetric warfare and on Muslim women in the security forces. An itinerant couple, she and her husband split time between their residences in Iloilo City and Manila, and usually spend their summer vacation abroad. Rosalie grew up in San Felipe, Zambales, Philippines and finished her Bachelors at University of the Philippines, Diliman in 1991.

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Most Recent Articles

January 8, 2012
The advent season invariably leads me to engage in a self-reflection on whether (and to what degree) I have been naughty or nice. Oftentimes, I am very confident I have done more good deeds than bad, mainly because I have little occasion to potentially do ill to somebody. As long as I did things on my own (as a professor, researcher and writer), my actions bear little direct consequence to others. I would like to think I have a modest amount of social capital after being in the academic profession for 20 odd years, which I could bank on in case I veer towards the naughty territory.
November 27, 2011
Of the things I never expected from being an administrator, bearing witness to dramas is at the top. I had my fair share of dramas from working with artist-colleagues before, but outside of academic settings. My past year as Division chair was replete with stories of conflict that made me appreciate the personality and emotional maturity required for a job that puts me in charge of 32 faculty members, 2 academic programs with 6 specializations and 470+ students (not to mention academic bosses who expect you to deliver). As drama goes, they produced a mix of happy and sad endings that were tough for the conscience and for relationships.
October 25, 2011
In travel, detours present unlikely possibilities. As an academic, I have taken very few of these in my quest to get published and move at the top of my specialization. I have always taken a purposeful approach towards my time and effort-- whether attending a conference (network! find publication outlets! project collaborators!) or picking a topic to read or write about (must tie in with the military! build up, not out, onto existing corpus of personal publication!).
September 18, 2011
A friend and fellow academic from Monash University, Sunway Campus in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia recently came for a 4-day scoping visit in Iloilo. My husband I are helping him establish connections, line up resources and connections and scout for logistics for a study tour for 18-20 students in January 2013. The “In Search of Iloilo” visit is the 8th such activity in Southeast Asia he has independently planned and carried out for his home institution. Previously, he has brought different groups of students to Saigon, Yogyakarta and Baguio.
August 16, 2011
On my way back from Bandung, Indonesia, I received two messages which set me hollering in joy in the crowded departure lounge of the Manila airport. A young colleague was awarded a Fulbright grant for a PhD in the US; two others were short-listed for Fulbright research grants in agriculture. What really touched me were the effusive thanks on their part for my encouraging them to apply and for believing in their competitiveness as applicants.
July 26, 2011
In the hustle and grind of academic life, there are those who are contented with their tenure position and just “teach and go.” Others labor under pressure to research and publish, churning in proposals, reports and manuscripts for the elusive promotion and recognition in their discipline. A few rise above these professional or livelihood imperatives to nurture and strengthen the University’s sense of community. They are problem solvers, social capital builders and serve as an overall repository of institutional memories.
June 23, 2011
Graduation and opening exercises bookend my university’s academic calendar and they are events which I make sure not to miss. The former I attend religiously because it gives me a once-in a-year chance to wear my PhD garb and to cheer my senior thesis advisees as they march one by one in their various fashionable expositions of the barong (pineapple fiber cloth) and sablay (the maroon-green-gold sash with the pre-Hispanic alphabet rendering of our University initials).
May 19, 2011
“I am going on a writing break” reads the opening statement of my letter to the University Chancellor explaining why I am going to the US Pacific Northwest for four weeks in May. If one considers that temperature rises to over 100 degrees Fahrenheit with 90% humidity during the Philippine summer, surely escape to a temperate country if one can afford it is a reasonable option. Being married to an American, my annual sojourns to the US are regular events my reneging-fellow paranoid University officials are used to.
April 12, 2011
Recently, two events engendered some serious self-reflection on my “why I am in the teaching profession” question: two landmark sexual harassment cases against colleagues and the sudden death of a retired Political Science professor. They expose the lack of a clear sense of private/public boundaries among academics with respect to their students, and the good or evil that arises from it.
March 10, 2011
My university has one of the worst health records around. In the past five years, four colleagues and two staff members have died due to coronary heart failure and stroke. There are also quite a number of workers who have suffered heart attacks. The succession of deaths (and the rate of hospitalization for others with chronic illness, particularly borderline diabetes) was so alarming that HMOs have to charge us more than a 100% increase in our annual group premiums.


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