Rosalie Arcala Hall

Rosalie Arcala Hall is a Professor of Political Science at the University of the Philippines Visayas in picturesque Miagao, Iloilo. She finished her Ph.D. in Public and International Affairs at Northeastern University (Boston, MA) in 2002. Rosalie and her husband, Bruce, an American, have lived in Tokyo, Japan; Innsbruck, Austria and Chicago, USA in line with research fellowships she received.

Rosalie has also conducted research on post-conflict civil-military relations in the Aceh, Indonesia; Dili, EastTimor; and Mindanao,Philippines. She is currently working on research projects with American and European collaborators on military mergers; asymmetric warfare and on Muslim women in the security forces. An itinerant couple, she and her husband split time between their residences in Iloilo City and Manila, and usually spend their summer vacation abroad. Rosalie grew up in San Felipe, Zambales, Philippines and finished her Bachelors at University of the Philippines, Diliman in 1991.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

February 8, 2011
On the 3rd of January, I showed up bright and early for my Comparative Politics class and was peeved that only 1/3 of my students showed up. One student who was due to deliver an oral report said she wasn’t ready because “she didn’t think I would hold classes that day.” I was similarly aghast that many of the faculty members from my Division were also absent that day. The Arts and Sciences building felt like a ghost town--the habitués having decided they needed an extra day to recuperate from their holiday hangover.
January 11, 2011
After two decades in the academe, I have purposely avoided being nominated to any administrative position. This came from an earlier conviction that I would rather be a serious scholar than a paper-pushing bureaucrat. Because the pool of would-be university administrators seems to draw disproportionately from a handful of PhD holders, I thought it was a great disservice to have such expensive education wasted on the banality of managing. Besides, being tied to a desk job is the antithesis of my desire to travel abroad.
December 12, 2010
My sister recently visited a physician in Manila who turned out to be a former undergraduate student of mine in Iloilo. Recognizing the common surname (Arcala), the doctor gushed about how I had tempted her to switch from a Biology major to a Political Science major, upon taking my General Education class in Social, Economic and Political Theory. To this day she remembers Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau and Marx and the engaging manner in which I embedded their ideas in their historical milieus.
November 9, 2010
Having recently acquired my own iPod touch, I finally found a reason to do some serious weeding of my address book. I realized that I have active mobile phone numbers of 4 army generals and numerous colonels, majors and lieutenants. Some years back, I have included notations on the units where they belong and their station to better manage this growing data. The notations have become more diverse-- J3, OG7, engineering, CRS, RCDG, EastMinCom-- indicating the many types of soldiers I have encountered in the course of my research career.
October 11, 2010
The academic calendar is symbolic of how an institution values time. It pegs the community to set dates like enrollment and graduations; exam periods and study periods; and holidays and vacations. In my university’s case, what is not contained in the calendar is more instructive than what it actually says. Like many non-modern societies, we take a more malleable approach to time and along with it, a less strict teaching regimen.
September 8, 2010
For women in the academy, one’s name is akin to a passport which under no circumstance must you tamper with. Your reputation as a scholar is attached to your name, which when subjected to a Google search, may yield only a few or a substantial number of hits depending on if it is correctly remembered or spelled. Unlike men, marriage pressures women to decide whether or not to make this changed civil status a separate “name reality” from their professional one. It is a tough choice to make.
August 3, 2010
There is something about the air in America that seduces the senses. To those who have never been to the land of milk and honey, the scent one encounters in opening the ubiquitous balikbayan box (Filipino care package) is a close proxy. It is intoxicating, tempting and proven to induce reckless behavior among even the well-intentioned foreigner, even serious academics.


Back to Top