Ry Rivard

Ry Rivard, Reporter, joined Inside Higher Ed in 2013, after nearly four and a half years at the Charleston Daily Mail in West Virginia, including three as a statehouse reporter. He covered seven statewide elections, two governors, multimillion-dollar contracts gone awry and high-profile litigation. He is a 2008 graduate of West Virginia University and a former college newspaper editor.

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Most Recent Articles

December 18, 2014
Dowling College's seventh president of the last 10 years hopes to be the one who can save it.
December 12, 2014
A deal meant to help Yeshiva University cope with its financial difficulties has fallen apart, according to reports.
December 12, 2014
At Cornell University's medical college, the daughter of a wealthy donor is replacing her father as leader of its board.
December 11, 2014
There's quite a bit of money to be made advising colleges on how to enroll students. On Tuesday, the Advisory Board Co. announced it's buying Virginia-based enrollment management consultant Royall & Company for $850 million. 
December 5, 2014
As voters and politicians in California's expensive Bay Area push higher minimum wages, at least two public universities aren't paying it.
December 4, 2014
A bullet goes through through the front door of a Texas community college board member's home. Is it because he is critical of the administration and his fellow board members?
December 3, 2014
The University of Alabama at Birmingham cites costs as it ends its football program in one of the country's most football-friendly states.
December 2, 2014
The entertainer Bill Cosby has resigned as a trustee of his alma mater, Temple University, a post he had held since 1982, the university announced Monday. Cosby’s involvement in higher education is extensive, but institutions are distancing themselves from him because of allegations, some new and some old, that he assaulted 20 women over the years.
November 25, 2014
Lincoln University of Pennsylvania resignation follows intense criticism over comments about women.
November 24, 2014
Pensacola State College faculty voted no confidence late last week in their president, Edward Meadows. The union and the administration are at an impasse in contract negotiations. The faculty cited five major reasons, including a culture of reprisal, cronyism, disregard for the terms of their contract, poor funding and attempting to prevent coverage of the labor dispute by the student newspaper. "This vote was necessary to bring faculty concerns to the Board of Trustees.


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