Sarah Bray

Sarah Hardesty Bray, Opinion Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in 2015 after serving as vice president of communications and marketing, and editor-in-chief of Trusteeship magazine, for the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges. Previously, she worked for 11 years as a senior editor for The Chronicle of Higher Education.  She has also been a vice president of communications at the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, a vice president at the international public relations firm of Hill and Knowlton, and a reporter at Forbes magazine. Sarah is the co-author of Success and Betrayal: The Crisis of Women in Corporate America, published by Simon & Schuster and featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, USA Today, and many other print and broadcast outlets. Sarah graduated from Duke University with a B.A. in English and history, and she received an M.S. in journalism from Northwestern University.

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Most Recent Articles

March 1, 2018
Jennifer Polk and L. Maren Wood give advice on how to use networking to be just right for the job market.
February 28, 2018
Nicholas C. Burbules, C. K. Gunsalus, Robert A. Easter and BrandE Faupell have created a tool to help you diagnose problems in your academic unit and identify ways to improve it.
February 14, 2018
Skills and knowledge gained from relevant work experience -- and not credentials -- are what will open doors and create opportunities for graduate degree holders, write Jennifer Polk and L. Maren Wood.
February 7, 2018
Few institutions and associations have considered the particular hurdles conference participation presents for women scholars with children, argue Angela L. Bos, Jennie Sweet-Cushman and Monica Schneider.
February 5, 2018
The new social contract calls for us to adapt to the reality that data and discovery challenge people’s worldview, write Jason Hamilton and Thomas J. Pfaff.
December 20, 2017
Craig Weidemann and Marie A. Cini provide some strategies and tactics for gaining a seat at the decision-making table.
December 5, 2017
Having a theory of how people learn would allow teachers to plan pedagogy more effectively and examine all factors relevant to learning, argue Stephen L. Chew and William J. Cerbin.
November 28, 2017
If colleges choose to increase the standard of proof, they should recognize the impact it will have and prepare to mitigate it, write Josh Gupta-Kagan and Mary Eschelbach Hansen.
November 3, 2017
We should challenge dominant ways of knowing and expose hidden assumptions that are often taken for granted, argue Jessica C. Harris and Chris Linder.
November 2, 2017
Don Haviland, Anna M. Ortiz and Laura Henriques advise how to create a strong reappointment, tenure or promotion file.


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