Sarah Bray

Sarah Hardesty Bray, Opinion Editor, came to Inside Higher Ed in 2015 after serving as vice president of communications and marketing, and editor-in-chief of Trusteeship magazine, for the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges. Previously, she worked for 11 years as a senior editor for The Chronicle of Higher Education.  She has also been a vice president of communications at the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, a vice president at the international public relations firm of Hill and Knowlton, and a reporter at Forbes magazine. Sarah is the co-author of Success and Betrayal: The Crisis of Women in Corporate America, published by Simon & Schuster and featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, USA Today, and many other print and broadcast outlets. Sarah graduated from Duke University with a B.A. in English and history, and she received an M.S. in journalism from Northwestern University.

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Most Recent Articles

October 3, 2017
Christine Harrington and Todd Zakrajsek share successful strategies that often take only a few minutes of class time.
September 22, 2017
Bruce Jackson’s approach to education can serve as an example for us all, write John Mateja and Arlene Lieberman.
September 1, 2017
A year of national service before, during or after college will better prepare our students to complete their degrees, secure meaningful employment and become lifelong engaged citizens, write E. Gordon Gee, Eduardo Padrón and Anthony P. Monaco.
July 7, 2017
Unfair biases lead to the undervaluation of the role of such research in the advancement of knowledge, write David S. Rovnyak and George C. Shields.
June 13, 2017
Many humanists have difficulty presenting their case because they are used to speaking one way among themselves and another way to outsiders, argue Gary Saul Morson and Morton Schapiro.
May 30, 2017
The administration’s recently released budget proposal, containing systematic and unfounded cuts to important education programs, will destabilize and destroy a system that is meant to help our students, argue Adriano Espaillat, Shaun Abreu and Amber Moorer.
January 25, 2017
The University of Kentucky, as the state’s flagship institution, has a moral responsibility to provide access to students of limited means, write Eli Capilouto and Tim Tracy, and thus is radically shifting the ratio of merit to need-based aid to do so.
November 15, 2016
The traditional definition of at-risk students is wrong, and we need to do more to help students caught in an institutional blind spot, write Angela Baldasare, Melissa Vito and Vincent J. Del Casino Jr.
November 11, 2016
Three cabinet secretaries -- from the U.S. Departments of Defense, Education and Veterans Affairs -- urge colleges and universities to help more veterans pursue their degrees and describe some ways to do so.
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