Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

June 11, 2015
Many faculty members are quitting jobs in Venezuela, where they are finding it impossible to support themselves on government-mandated salaries that are as low as the equivalent of $30 a month, the Associated Press reported. At the Central University of Venezuela, for example, 700 faculty members (out of a total of 4,000) have quit in the last four years.
June 11, 2015
James Billington announced Wednesday that he will retire at the end of the year as librarian of Congress. A scholar of Russia, Billington was nominated for the position (which doesn't have a term of office) by President Reagan and has served since 1987.
June 11, 2015
The five largest research publishers (a group that changes a bit by discipline) started publishing half of academic papers in 2006, up from 30 percent in 1996 and 20 percent in 1973, according to new research published Wednesday in PLOS ONE by researchers at the University of Montreal. The piece argues that this concentration has reached oligopoly status and poses dangers to academic publishing.
June 11, 2015
In today's Academic Minute, Jean M. Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University, discusses her research on the sexuality of the age group she calls Generation Me. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
June 11, 2015
Inside Higher Ed is pleased to release today “Evolving Learning for the New Digital Era,” our latest print-on-demand booklet. Articles focus on changing methods of teaching and learning -- and the strategies used by different institutions. You may download the free booklet here.
June 11, 2015
Tim Hunt, a British biochemist who shared the 2001 Nobel Prize in Medicine, on Wednesday quit his job as a professor at University College London amid criticism over his comments on women. The university issued a statement confirming his resignation. “UCL was the first university in England to admit women students on equal terms to men, and the university believes that this outcome is compatible with our commitment to gender equality,” said the statement.
June 10, 2015
The American Academy of Arts & Sciences has released the first of a series of publications seeking to increase public understanding of and support for public universities. “Public Research Universities: Why They Matter” reviews the mission of these institutions, their contributions to state and regional economies, and their efforts to spend funds responsibly, among other topics.
June 10, 2015
A new study finds that those who take the Medical College Admission Test with extra time are admitted to medical schools at the same rates as other applicants but have lower graduation rates from medical school than do their fellow students. Individuals with disabilities are entitled under federal law to accommodations in tests, and those accommodations sometimes include extra time. MCAT takers who receive extra time are almost as likely (44 percent vs.
June 10, 2015
A New York State appeals court on Tuesday unanimously found that the City University of New York was within its rights to adopt its Pathways program, which focuses on the structure of the curriculum to allow community college students to transfer with credit to four-year colleges in the system and complete bachelor's degrees in four years, Capital New York reported.

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