Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

April 7, 2015
In today's Academic Minute, Glenn Geher, a psychologist at the State University of New York at New Paltz, discusses why you might very well share some DNA with these ancestors of ours. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.  
April 7, 2015
Kyushu University, in Japan, has ended a long taboo on discussing vivisections performed on American prisoners of war during World War II, The Japan Times reported. The experiments -- viewed by experts as extreme torture -- led to the convictions of 14 university employees in the war crimes trial that followed the war. But after that, the incidents were never discussed in public.
April 7, 2015
A student at Salisbury University, in Maryland, has just become the third this academic year to be diagnosed with tuberculosis, The Washington Post reported. The university is asking 385 students who came into contact with at least one of the students to be tested for the disease. Authorities are not sure how the students were exposed.
April 6, 2015
The Board of Regents of Northern New Mexico College voted in January to change the institution's name to Northern New Mexico University. The move didn't attract much attention at the time, but has become controversial, The New Mexican reported. Some say that only the Legislature has the authority to make such a name change.
April 6, 2015
The Community College of Philadelphia is starting a free community college program, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. Tuition will be waived for students who are graduates of the city's high schools and are eligible for Pell Grants. Students, once enrolled, will be required to earn degrees within three years and to maintain a 2.5 grade point average.  
April 6, 2015
A Massachusetts trial is providing details about allegations that Mark Zimny, a consultant, convinced a wealthy Hong Kong businessman to pay him more than $2 million to get the businessman's sons into Ivy League colleges, The Boston Globe reported. Zimny is facing wire fraud, bank fraud and other charges -- all of which he has denied.
April 6, 2015
Michigan State University fans are notorious for rioting after they either win or are eliminated from the men's Division I basketball tournament, and plenty of East Lansing store owners can attest to the damage this has caused over the years. This year, when the Spartans were eliminated on Saturday by Duke University, the action in the streets was minimal, with only seven people arrested, The Lansing State Journal reported.
April 6, 2015
In today's Academic Minute, Ellen Foxman, a postdoctoral fellow and instructor in laboratory medicine at Yale University, discusses her research on the way the rhinovirus travels. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.  
April 6, 2015
Rolling Stone on Sunday evening formally retracted a much discredited November article about an alleged gang rape at the University of Virginia. The magazine announced its retraction in releasing a report prepared by officials of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism that Rolling Stone commissioned when numerous questions were raised about the accuracy of the article, "A Rape on Campus," which almost immediately caused a sensation.
April 6, 2015
Many educators have a tough time imagining a world where academic issues are more important than athletic ones at institutions with big-time programs. "Saturday Night Live" this weekend created such a world.    

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