Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

September 27, 2006
Brooklyn College of the City University of New York is starting a new MFA in performance and interactive media arts. Advanced certificate programs will also be offered.DePaul University is starting a new master of arts program in women's and gender studies.Johns Hopkins University is starting an interdisciplinary minor for undergraduates in museums and society.
September 26, 2006
Computer science -- like many dot.com businesses of a few years back -- has experienced a boom and bust in the last decade. First colleges couldn't expand programs fast enough to meet demand, but more recently students have been fleeing. The number of students taking Advanced Placement tests in computer science fell by 19 percent in the last three years -- even as other AP science programs were growing.
September 26, 2006
Female professors are less likely than men to feel they know what is expected of them to earn tenure, study finds.
September 26, 2006
The U.S. State Department has again denied a visa to Tariq Ramadan, a Swiss scholar teaching at the University of Oxford, who has been invited to speak and teach in the United States. In June, a federal judge ordered the government to either grant a visa or provide an explanation of why it would not do so. The visa was denied on the basis of donations Ramadan made to charitable groups in France that the State Department says support terrorism through Hamas.
September 25, 2006
Five research universities are being awarded $250,000 grants today for efforts to promote flexible career paths for faculty members, allowing them to balance career and family goals. The University of Washington, for example, will receive funds to start a pilot paid parental leave program and add slots for infant and toddler day care, among other things.
September 25, 2006
Endowment accuses scholarly group of "inaccuracies and distortions" -- while admitting that it changed peer review system.
September 25, 2006
GAO finds that letting some colleges jointly set aid policies doesn't result in students paying more -- or less.
September 22, 2006
For an event that won't take place, the planned appearance by Iran's president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, resulted in plenty of announcements from Columbia University on Wednesday and Thursday.
September 22, 2006
Existing tools and measurements could allow colleges to develop meaningful rankings to replace widely discredited rankings developed by magazines, according to a report being released today by Education Sector, a think tank. The report repeats criticisms that have been made of the U.S. News & World Report rankings, saying that they are largely based on fame, wealth and exclusivity.
September 21, 2006
Students at Randolph-Macon Woman's College have suspended a boycott -- in which about 200 students have stayed out of classes and the dining halls -- when administrators agreed to present their demands to the Board of Trustees, the Associated Press reported. Students are angry over a plan the board approved to admit men.Webster University, a St.

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