Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

March 16, 2005
Direct lending supporters accuse some lenders of delays on consolidation; Democrats and Republicans trade charges in Congress.
March 16, 2005
A faculty vote goes against Harvard's president; Summers asks professors to work with him.
March 16, 2005
A major player in for-profit higher education adds to its medical offerings.
March 16, 2005
A for-profit group in Oregon and Washington State -- facing several investigations -- shut  down suddenly at the end of last week.
March 16, 2005
Iowa's David Skorton uses "The Facebook" to stay in touch with students.
March 15, 2005
The median salary for mid-level administrators increased 3.0 percent this year, compared to 2.1 percent last year, according to a new report.
March 15, 2005
The Colorado student David Horowitz loves to talk about does exist, but university officials offer evidence that her story doesn't check out.
March 15, 2005
Did the new SAT leave students famished, satisfied or feeling like they had inside information on the essay? All of the above.
March 15, 2005
A new study from the University of Toronto suggests that higher education -- and lots of it -- may prevent memory loss as we age.The study involved putting groups of young adults (aged 18 to 30) and older adults (65 and up) through various memory tests. At the same time, the researchers used magnetic resonance imaging to study brain activity in the two groups. Later, results were compared based on educational attainment.
March 14, 2005
The new SAT was given for the first time Saturday; to many students, the much-publicized writing test wasn't that big a deal.

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