Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

March 21, 2017
When college admissions officers have more information about the high schools attended by low-income applicants, those applicants are more likely to be admitted, according to a study published in the new issue of Educational Researcher (abstract available here). In the study, 311 admissions officers from competitive-admissions colleges reviewed fictional applications from students with different socioeconomic backgrounds, and with different levels of information about the high schools.
March 21, 2017
Author discusses new book about the importance of vision and values in higher education.
March 21, 2017
Arizona State University: Howard Schultz, CEO and chairman of Starbucks. Canisius College: Christine Licata-Culhane, senior associate provost at Rochester Institute of Technology; and Nelson D. Civello, former president of the Fixed Income Capital Markets Group for Dain Rauscher Corp.
March 21, 2017
Inside Higher Ed is pleased to release today our latest print-on-demand compilation, "Lifelong Learning Through Alternative Credentials." You may download the booklet, free, here.
March 21, 2017
A new report on students' college searches and social media notes the importance of search-and-review sites, where colleges are included (sometimes based on fees they pay) with information that may or may not reflect what colleges would put in front of prospective students. The report, by Chegg, NRCCUA and Target X, found that 93 percent of students use one of these sites at least once while searching for a college. The ever-growing list of such sites makes it challenging for colleges to keep up and to focus attention, the report says.
March 20, 2017
The City University of New York is making changes in its approach to remedial education, The New York Times reported. Among the changes are less reliance on testing for placement of students in remedial courses, including providing automatic retesting for those who score just below the level needed to be placed in college-level classes.
March 20, 2017
Robert S. Eitel is working as a special assistant for Education Secretary Betsy DeVos while he is on unpaid leave as vice president for regulatory legal services at Bridgepoint Education Inc., The New York Times reported. It is not uncommon for some people with experience in the for-profit sector to take positions in the Education Department, but it is unusual for this to take place while they are on leave.
March 20, 2017
Hampshire students accused of attacking Central Maine Community College students over braids in their hair. Conflict is latest over contested adoption of one culture's styles by another.
March 20, 2017
The music of Chuck Berry, the rock pioneer who died Saturday at the age of 90, lives on in space. The Voyager Interstellar Record Committee, which planned the work of the Voyager spacecraft, placed on it a recording of Berry. Below is a letter sent to him on his 60th birthday, congratulating him on the honor. The original is in the collections of the Library of Congress.

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