Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

October 29, 2013
Student organizers at Hampshire College called off an appearance by the band Shokazoba amid complaints that the band was "too white" to play Afrobeat music, The Republican reported. Band members are angry, saying that they were falsely accused of being all-white, and that it should be possible for music to be judged on artistic value, not just the race of some of the musicians.
October 29, 2013
Berry College, a private institution in Georgia, announced Monday that it has settled (and won) a dispute with Tennessee. Berry sued Tennessee last year when the state tried to impose fees on the college because of two billboards that it put up. The state said that Berry was effectively operating a college in Tennessee. But Berry said that this was untrue, and that the college wasn't offering courses in the state (or even distance education).
October 29, 2013
Student protests blocking access to Kliment Ochridsky University, Bulgaria's largest university, have forced officials to suspend classes, the Associated Press reported. Students' grievances focus on the government, and university leaders have been urging them -- without success -- to let the university function.  
October 28, 2013
After four people were shot at a party at the University of Southern California at year ago, officials set new rules on security. But as The Los Angeles Times reported, many student leaders and organizations don't like the new regulations. Student organizations must pay for more security for many events, and student leaders say that this makes it more difficult to organize events. Many students reject the idea that security is their responsibility.
October 28, 2013
American Public University System has started a bachelor of science in sports management. James Madison University and the University of Salamanca have started a dual master's program for Spanish language educators in which students will earn a master of languages and culture from Salamanca and a master of education from James Madison.
October 28, 2013
In today's Academic Minute, Christoph Adami of Michigan State University reveals why evolution favors cooperation over selfish behavior. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
October 28, 2013
Just about every year, Halloween brings campus disputes over costumes built around ethnic or racial stereotypes. Several universities this year are trying -- in advance of Halloween -- to discourage offensive costumes. The University of Colorado at Boulder has put posters up on campus that show members of different racial and ethnic groups -- and some of the stereotypes that have been the basis of costumes. The tag line for the posters: "You wear the costume for one night.
October 28, 2013
The University of Illinois at Chicago spent $1 million on a house for Chancellor Paula Allen-Meares when she took office five years ago. The idea was that the house would then be used for events that would support the university. But The Chicago Tribune reported that in the last four years, only 11 events have been held there. The article raises questions about why so much money was spent on a facility used for its stated purpose so rarely.

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