Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

September 2, 2014
University adds optional application essay on sexual orientation and gender identity.
September 2, 2014
Scholars at annual meeting were forced to evacuate their rooms Friday night -- but meeting one another in pajamas didn't stop them from tweeting.
September 2, 2014
The Lynn, Mass. public school district has ended an 11-year relationship with Gordon College in which the latter sent student volunteers into the schools, The Boston Globe reported.
September 2, 2014
Southern Connecticut State tells Chegg that university's contract with Barnes & Noble bans anyone else from marketing textbook rentals to students.  
September 2, 2014
Oklahoma State University students created a sign for their institution's football game against Florida State University (team name "Seminoles") that read in part "Send 'Em 'Home #Trail of Tears," The Tulsa World reported.
September 2, 2014
Most colleges were initially cautious about adopting policies about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, which started in countries that send relatively few students to the United States. But with the outbreak continuing, some colleges are announcing extra health screenings for students arriving from some countries in West Africa, the Associated Press reported.
September 2, 2014
The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is willing to make a financial settlement with Steven Salaita, the controversial scholar whose hiring was blocked last month by Chancellor Phyllis Wise amid debate over Salaita's anti-Israel comments. To date, Illinois has suggested that because the hiring never received required board approval, there was no firing.
September 2, 2014
The Communist Party Committee at Peking University has published an article in an influential journal in China demanding that students and faculty members not criticize the party, Reuters reported. Students and professors must "take a firm stand and be unequivocal, and fight against speech and actions that touch upon the party's and country's principles and bottom lines in a timely, efficient and resolute manner," said the article.

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