Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

October 8, 2013
Francois Englert of Université Libre de Bruxelles and Peter W. Higgs of the University of Edinburgh were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics this morning. They were honored for "the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider."  
October 7, 2013
A survey by the Louisiana Board of Regents has found that one-third of the endowed chairs created through a matching grant program by the state are unfilled, The Shreveport Times reported. Campus officials said that endowed chairs can be hard to fill. As a result of the survey, a new rule will bar institutions that have more than 20 percent of their chairs unfilled from adding a new endowed chair.  
October 7, 2013
The "Pay It Forward" concept -- in which students would not pay tuition to attend public colleges, but would pay a share of their salaries after graduation -- has attracted considerable attention in recent months. But a coalition of education groups issued a statement Friday opposing the idea.
October 7, 2013
In today’s Academic Minute, C. David Williams of Harvard University explains how our bodies store and release energy as we move. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
October 7, 2013
Three researchers were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Medicine this morning for "their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells." The winners are: James E. Rothman, professor and chair of cell biology at Yale University; Randy W. Schekman, professor of molecular and cell biology at the the University of California at Berkeley and an investigator of Howard Hughes Medical Institute; and Thomas C.
October 7, 2013
Tensions surrounding the spending by Westfield State University's president have escalated over the past few days.
October 7, 2013
NYU offers to permit election on collective bargaining for teaching assistants, but not for research assistants. Move marks shift for university, but union leader says it is based on "arbitrary distinctions."
October 7, 2013
Six current or former University of Louisville women's lacrosse players have accused the coach, Kellie Young, of abusive tactics, The Courier-Journal reported.
October 7, 2013
Adam Ackley and Azusa Pacific University jointly announced on Friday that he would be leaving his position at the university. Ackley has taught theology at Azusa Pacific for 15 years, and until recently he did so as a woman. When he revealed that he was transgender and had transitioned to become a man, officials at the Christian university questioned whether he could stay. Students and others have rallied around Ackley.
October 7, 2013
U.S. News & World Report has announced revisions (downward) of the statistics given by Providence College for the average SAT and ACT scores of the class that entered in fall 2012. The average critical reading score on the SAT was really 569, not the 611 that had been reported. The average mathematics score on the SAT was 580, not the 624 reported. Further, the composite ACT score was 25, not 28.

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