Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

May 2, 2012
Authorities in China have arrested two education brokers and 18 students for trying to fraudulently win admission to Korean universities, The Korea Herald reported. The scheme is alleged to involve creating fake high school diplomas and other school records for the students, who do not meet standards for admission to Korean universities. Chinese authorities are expanding their investigation, expecting to find more such cases.
May 2, 2012
The California State University System board will consider a policy next week that would freeze the pay of campus presidents, but allow foundations associated with the campuses to pay for raises, The Los Angeles Times reported. The system has been strongly criticized in recent months for increasing pay for some presidential hires amid new rounds of budget cuts and tuition increases.
May 2, 2012
Authorities expect to make several charges -- some of them felonies -- today in the investigation into the hazing death last year of a student at Florida A&M University, The Orlando Sentinel reported. Several people will be charged. The student who died was in the university's marching band, famous for its performances and also blamed for years for hazing incidents.
May 1, 2012
St. John's College, the Annapolis institution with a curriculum built on the Great Books, has updated its fight song to better reflect its values, The Baltimore Sun reported. The song that has been used for a century featured typical references to fighting. The song didn't get much use lately because St. John's athletic teams are in sports -- crew, croquet, sailing and fencing -- not traditionally associated with marching bands and fight songs.
May 1, 2012
The Simons Foundation today plans to announced a $60 million grant to the University of California at Berkeley to create a center for the study of the theory of computing, The New York Times reported. The newspaper reported that the work to be done in the center reflects the breadth of fields from the physical and social sciences in which computing theory has growing influence.
May 1, 2012
The Tennessee Senate passed a bill Monday that would require Vanderbilt University to change its anti-bias policies with regard to student organizations, The Tennessean reported. Vanderbilt uses an "all comers" policy of the sort that has been upheld for public institutions by the U.S. Supreme Court. This means that to be recognized as an official student organization, groups cannot discriminate against any student who wants to participate.
May 1, 2012
An American Bar Association panel reviewing law school accrediting requirements is divided on whether to continue to mandate that law schools use the Law School Admissions Test. The panel has agreed to put forward two versions on the issue: one that continues the requirement, and one that does not.
May 1, 2012
In today’s Academic Minute, Allen Hurlbert of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill reveals how different species of migratory birds are responding to global climate change. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

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