Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

February 16, 2012
Johnson & Wales University has agreed to triple its annual payment to Providence (from $309,000 to at least $958,000), the Associated Press reported.
February 16, 2012
About 85 students at George Washington University are suffering from norovirus, which typically leads to several uncomfortable days, but is not life-threatening, The Washington Post reported. Students with norovirus tend to experience diarrhea, vomiting, nausea and stomach cramps. Close quarters in which college students tend to live make it easy for the norovirus to spread.
February 16, 2012
In today’s Academic Minute, Gavin Schmidt of Columbia University explains why we shouldn’t always expect scientists to agree. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
February 16, 2012
Authorities have charged two African-American female students at Montclair State University with creating the racist threatening note they reported finding on their door, The Star-Ledger reported. Reports about the note left many black students feeling unsafe. The reported discovery of the threat against black students followed a campus rally against threats (real ones) that had been found against gay people.
February 16, 2012
The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that the University of Connecticut's donor records are not covered by the state's open records laws, The Hartford Courant reported. The court ruled that the exemptions in the law for trade secrets apply to these records.  
February 16, 2012
Heather Munroe-Blum, principal (president equivalent) of McGill University, will be leaving her position -- among the most prominent in Canadian academe -- next year, The Montreal Gazette reported. McGill's research programs and fund-raising capabilities have grown substantially during Munroe-Blum's tenure, which started in 2003. The university faced employee strikes and student protests in the last year, but Munroe-Blum said that those incidents had not led to her decision.
February 16, 2012
Quentin Hanley of Nottingham Trent University has completed a study questioning whether several leading American for-profit universities should be called universities, Times Higher Education reported. Since 1993, he said, the University of Phoenix has produced fewer than 200 papers, which have been cited about 700 times. He found about 100 papers from Kaplan University, with a little more than 500 citations.
February 16, 2012
Kean University trustees decide that old inaccuracies aren't a good reason to get rid of a president they like.
February 15, 2012
The University of Michigan Board of Regents may vote this week to remove a bylaw provision that requires the president to step down in the fiscal year that the person turns 70, AnnArbor.com reported. Officials said that the move is intended to comply with laws against age discrimination. The move may have a direct impact on the current president, Mary Sue Coleman, who is 68.  
February 15, 2012
Britain plans to exempt about 1,000 foreign graduates of its universities from tighter rules about to start on staying in the country after graduation, Times Higher Education reported. Those with "world-class innovative ideas" will be allowed to stay.

Pages

Back to Top