Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

February 3, 2015
Israeli authorities are investigating the practice of a former professor at the University of California at Santa Cruz of listing his academic affiliation in his journal articles as Ariel University, an institution he has never visited, Haaretz reported. The professor listed Ariel as an affiliation on seven articles in 2014 and two this year.
February 3, 2015
The board of Boston University announced Monday that it has rejected a proposal from a campus group that the university sell investments in companies that produce guns for civilians. The board also released policies on when the university should sell investments for non-financial reasons. Those policies place a particular emphasis on the dangers of the appearance of the university as a whole taking a political position.
February 3, 2015
The following colleges and universities have announced their commencement speakers for spring 2015:
February 3, 2015
In today's Academic Minute, Paul Matthew Sutter, a theoretical physicist at Ohio State University, discusses the idea of nothingness through the lens of cosmology. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.  
February 3, 2015
Lani Guinier discusses her new critique of college admissions.
February 3, 2015
The Princeton Review announced Monday that it is taking additional action against the University of Missouri at Kansas City, in the wake of the release of an audit Friday that confirmed that the business school at the university had provided false information for ratings. On Sunday night, the Princeton Review announced it would remove the business school's listing as among the top entrepreneurial programs for 2014.
February 3, 2015
A new study by the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, a research organization that focuses on income inequality, argues that efforts to close education inequality would have a huge impact on the economy. The study runs through a series of scenarios involving moving children from the bottom three-quarters socioeconomically to the levels of education achievement of those in the top quarter. In each scenario, there would be dramatic gains in income, tax payments and other measures of economic well-being.  
February 3, 2015
Guilford College has moved a lecture by Steven Salaita, the controversial scholar whose hiring was blocked by officials of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, but not called off the event. The family of donors who paid for the building where Salaita was scheduled to speak objected to his appearing there. A statement from the college said that, in consultation with faculty members who organized the appearance, a new site was found. The statement said that had a new site not been found, the original location would have been used.
February 2, 2015
A Jewish fraternity at the University of California at Davis was defaced with swastikas this weekend, The Los Angeles Times reported.
February 2, 2015
With blizzards in the Midwest today and returning to New England, some colleges and universities in both regions are calling off classes.

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