Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

October 24, 2014
At Ohio State University and the University of Oklahoma, controversies involving marching bands have become significant issues on the campus and statewide.
October 23, 2014
In an interview in The New Yorker, President Obama expressed support for affirmative action in higher education, and questioned how precisely a Supreme Court deadline for phasing out the consideration of race should be viewed. The article looks broadly at President Obama's influence on the federal court system, and touches on affirmative action toward the end of the piece.
October 23, 2014
In today's Academic Minute, Phillip Sponenberg, professor of pathology and genetics at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech, profiles the issue of domestic extinction. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.  
October 23, 2014
Japan's government is starting a grant program that will provide support for up to 10 years for 37 universities in the country to seek to become more globally competitive, The Japan Times reported. Thirteen of the universities are being urged to develop plans to reach the global level of Harvard University or the University of Oxford. The other universities are being encouraged to improve, but without those aspirations.
October 23, 2014
Towson University has suspended Rabbi Barry Freundel from his faculty position, following his arrest on charges of secretly recording women as they bathed in a Jewish ritual bath at the synagogue he led in Washington, The Baltimore Sun reported. The university acted amid reports that he took some Towson students to the synagogue and fears that he may have engaged in inappropriate activity with them.
October 22, 2014
The University of Oklahoma has ended a ban by its marching band on members saying anything negative in public about the organization, The Oklahoman reported. Marching band members criticized the ban (anonymously, because of the ban) in newspaper ads in the state. After the ad ran, President David Boren lifted the ban and met with band members to hear their concerns about leadership of the marching band, which many members say has suffered a decline in quality.  
October 22, 2014
The University of South Florida has called off an agreement to host 14 journalists from Africa, citing concerns about Ebola, The St. Petersburg Tribune reported. Only two of the journalists were from countries that currently have Ebola outbreaks. The State Department, which runs the exchange program asked the university if it would accept the journalists from elsewhere in Africa and South Florida still declined.
October 22, 2014
Burlington County College, in New Jersey, is starting an associate degree in cybersecurity. Eastern Michigan University is starting an undergraduate major in media studies and journalism. Mount Mary University, in Wisconsin, is starting an online doctorate in occupational therapy.

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