Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

May 7, 2014
Legislation moving in the New York Senate and Assembly would require colleges to disclose the actual costs of study abroad programs and any financial relationships between study abroad providers and colleges, The Albany Times Union reported. Legislators are concerned that some study abroad programs actually cost colleges much less than institutions reveal to students, who may be paying the equivalent to the higher expenses they face at their home institutions.
May 7, 2014
Boston College is offering to return to the interview subjects oral history recordings that were made about "the Troubles," a period of intense protest and violence in Northern Ireland from the 1960s until the 1980s. British authorities (with backing from their U.S. counterparts) fought in U.S.
May 7, 2014
In today’s Academic Minute, King Davis, director of the Institute for Urban Policy Research and Analysis at the University of Texas at Austin, discusses his research from the Central Lunatic Asylum for the Colored Insane. Learn more about the Academic Minute here. .
May 7, 2014
The following colleges and universities have announced their commencement speakers for spring 2014:
May 7, 2014
Inside Higher Ed was wrong to assume on Monday that Rutgers University had resolved the controversies over its selection commencement speaker. The first speaker was to be Condoleezza Rice, the former secretary of state, but she withdrew amid student and faculty protests.
May 7, 2014
College students fail to eat or exercise in ways that would reduce their chances of cancer later in life, according to a study by Northwestern and Northeastern Illinois University researchers. The study, published in the journal Preventive Medicine, found that 95 percent of college students fail to eat the recommended amount of fruit and vegetables (at least five servings a day), and more than 60 percent report not getting enough physical activity.
May 7, 2014
With more than 500 member colleges, the Common Application remains a key force in admissions, even after taking a lot of hits in the last year for a botched launch of a new software system. But a competitor, the Universal College Application, is seeing growth. In the last year, as problems hit the Common Application, Universal added 12 new members, bringing its total to 43. Today, Universal is announcing six more members: Brandeis and Colgate Universities, the College of Mount Saint Vincent, the Universities of Chicago and Rochester, and Wilson College.  
May 7, 2014
East Carolina University has clarified that students making personal statements at departmental graduation celebrations are allowed to give thanks to God. A chemistry professor set off a debate by telling students that they could not mention God in these statements. The university on Tuesday -- facing criticism from religious bloggers -- issued a statement indicating that the professor was incorrect, and that graduates could thank God.  
May 7, 2014
The U.S. Supreme Court in April upheld the right of states to bar public colleges and universities to consider race or ethnicity in admissions decisions. On Tuesday, the U.S.
May 6, 2014
A new study published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences uses two longitudinal surveys to attempt to explain the relative academic advantage of Asian-American students, on average, compared to white students. It appears to be about work ethic.

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