Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

January 24, 2013
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor leading its inquiry into whether it inappropriately handled the federal prosecution of Aaron Swartz has provided some details on the investigation. In an open letter published in The Tech, MIT's student newspaper, Hal Abelson pledged a full and open inquiry, and said that the issues were extremely important. "This matter is urgently serious for MIT," Abelson wrote.
January 24, 2013
In today’s Academic Minute, Stefano Allesina of University of Chicago explores the link between an ecosystem’s diversity and its stability. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.  
January 24, 2013
Mills College has settled a disability complaint by federal officials by agreeing to make 368 changes in facilities by 2014, with additional projects to be completed by 2017 and then 2023, the Bay Area News Group reported. Federal officials had identified inaccessible facilities ranging from bathrooms to drinking fountains to parking to lecture halls.
January 24, 2013
Texas A&M University announced a major campaign to increase enrollment in engineering, with the goal of enrolling 25,000 students (more than double current levels) by 2025. The effort will involve both recruiting more students, but also looking for ways to improve the educational experience of engineering students.  
January 24, 2013
The Heritage Hall Museum, in Alabama, has canceled a short of work by Troy University faculty members. The Daily Home reported that some of the art caused offense. "It was supposed to be a group exhibit for Troy University’s communication/fine arts/design program," a museum official said.
January 23, 2013
Georgia State will evaluate courses much like it reviews other work done by students before they enroll. Academic Partnerships, which helps universities put degree programs online, will work with institutions to make first course in each degree a MOOC.
January 23, 2013
Jan. 23, 2013 -- Chief academic officers in an Inside Higher Ed survey are aware their institutions rely on non-tenure-track instructors, but don't expect much to change. And they see MOOCs more as a threat to their business models than as an improvement for academe. Inside Higher Ed collaborated with Gallup on this project. On February 14, Inside Higher Ed held a webinar on the results with on the results with Scott Jaschik, editor, and Robert Sternberg, provost of Oklahoma State University. You can watch the webinar here. The Inside Higher Ed survey of provosts was made possible in part by the generous financial support of ConnectEDU, InsideTrack, Jenzabar, McGraw-Hill Higher Education and PeopleAdmin.
January 23, 2013
In today’s Academic Minute, Marek Urban of the University of Southern Mississippi explains the creation of a material with the ability to heal itself. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.  
January 23, 2013
Male scientists are more likely than their female counterparts to engage in research fraud, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal mBio. The study analyzed a large database of cases of scientific fraud, categorized those who committed the fraud by different stages of careers and then compared those at different stages of their careers (from junior levels to senior scientists) to the gender make-up of the fields.

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