Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

February 7, 2012
In today’s Academic Minute, Elizabeth Gershoff of the University of Texas at Austin examines long-term outcomes among children subjected to spanking. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
February 7, 2012
Monday was the 101st anniversary of Ronald Reagan's birth -- and Young America's Foundation marked the occasion with release of a national poll suggesting that professors have yet to give the Gipper his rightful place in history. "Americans rate Ronald Reagan as the greatest president, but try telling that to professors on our nation’s campuses. In a recent survey, 60 percent of college professors did not even rank President Reagan among the top ten presidents," said a press release on the poll results.
February 7, 2012
A student at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside has confessed to writing the racial threats (including a hit list of students) that terrified the campus last week, TMJ4 News reported. The student had discovered a grouping of rubber bands that she took to be a noose and reported that discovery. The student told authorities that she was not satisfied with the investigation of the reported noose, so she made the threatening notes. Those notes prompted heightened security and several meetings on the campus.
February 6, 2012
An investigation by The Orlando Sentinel provides an in-depth look at the circumstances of the hazing death of a member of the marching band at Florida A&M University. The article details the significant programs in place to ban hazing, and the determination of band members to ignore all the warnings and rules.  
February 6, 2012
A cancer research institute at the University of Pennsylvania has sued its former scientific director, now president of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, charging him with taking research with him to start a biotechnology company, The New York Times reported. The lawsuit by the Leonard and Madlyn Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute at Penn called its former scientific director, Craig B.
February 6, 2012
Angel Taveras, the mayor of Providence, R.I., said last week that the city would go bankrupt unless it achieves certain savings and also obtains new revenue -- with much of the extra money coming from Brown University, the Associated Press reported. Taveras said that the university needs to commit to $40 million in additional payments over the next 10 years.
February 6, 2012
Kiplinger's has dropped Claremont McKenna College from the magazine's list of the "Best Values in Liberal Arts Colleges," where the college had been No. 18. A statement by the magazine said that recent reports about the college inflating its SAT averages suggested that it had earned its spot "unfairly," and so has been removed. U.S.
February 6, 2012
A documentary on CBC television has accused McGill University of taking money for many years from the asbestos industry, and of supporting research seen as favorable to that industry, The Montreal Gazette reported. Dozens of public health researchers have responded to the broadcast by sending letters asking McGill to sever ties to the industry and to reveal more about the funding that the university received.

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