Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

January 2, 2013
With the new film "Les Misérables" winning rave reviews, it was inevitable that a college parody would emerge, focusing on the struggles of today's students.    
January 2, 2013
Study raises questions about reliability of popular assessment tools used to measure learning that takes place in college. And research finds that students might not be as "academically adrift" as much-discussed book suggested.
January 2, 2013
The National College of the Arts in Lahore, Pakistan's leading art college, is under heavy criticism from Islamic traditionalists over its journal, which published homoerotic images that also depicted Muslim clerics, the Associated Press reported. The college has shut down the journal, pulled all copies of the journal from bookstores and dissolved the journal's editorial board, the AP reported. But those actions have not stopped the controversy.
January 2, 2013
Emory University students who produce "The Dooley Show," which is intended to be humorous, have issued an apology for a broadcast that angered many at the university. The show referenced the Supreme Court case on affirmative action in college admissions and urged viewers to help identify students who "shouldn’t be here and are only at the school because of affirmative action." Methods suggested for finding such students included lynching, tarring and feathering, and cross-burning.
January 2, 2013
Wyoming's attorney general has sued DegreeinaDay.com, which is based in Cheyenne, asking that it stop operating as an unaccredited institution, The Casper Star-Tribune reported. The site offered degrees in medicine, cosmetic dermatology, law and teaching based on life experience. The suit charged that the institution had no authority to award degrees. Officials from the website could not be reached for comment.
January 2, 2013
Taiwan's Ministry of Education has agreed to study whether universities are avoiding fair pay for faculty members by hiring part-time professors instead of full-time professors, The Taipei Times reported. Between 2001 and 2011, the number of part-time professors at universities in Taiwan increased by 63 percent.
January 2, 2013
State officials in Pennsylvania are preparing to sue the National Collegiate Athletic Association, perhaps as early as today, over the sanctions imposed on Pennsylvania State University, Sports Illustrated reported. Penn State -- which has accepted the association's penalties -- is not involved in preparing the suit.
December 31, 2012
A New York Times article examines the potential for conflict of interest in Quacquarelli Symonds (known as QS) operating an international rankings system for universities and also a "ratings" system -- with the latter open to those who pay for an audit.

Pages

Back to Top