Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

May 7, 2012
Many German academics are frustrated by the impact of the Bologna Process, under which European nations have moved to make their degree programs consistent and to outline appropriate learning outcomes, Times Higher Education reported. The article quoted comments from a conference in Germany where academics said that the Bologna emphasis on job-related skills had resulted in less emphasis on encouraging critical thinking skills.
May 7, 2012
J. Paul Reddam, owner of Saturday's Kentucky Derby winner, I'll Have Another, was once a philosophy professor at California State University at Los Angeles. He left academe to found DiTech, a mortgage loan company, and his sale of that company gave him the resources to become a major player in horse racing, The Louisville Courier-Journal reported.
May 7, 2012
The University of California at Berkeley on Friday fired Diane Leite, formerly an assistant vice chancellor, who was demoted previously but not fired when word surfaced that she had helped triple the pay of her lover, also a Berkeley employee, The San Jose Mercury News reported. When the scandal first broke, many Berkeley faculty members expressed shock that she wasn't fired immediately. Leite did not return calls and her lawyer declined to comment.
May 7, 2012
Sweet Briar College, faced with financial difficulties caused by lower than desired enrollment levels, is shrinking its faculty, and eliminating two majors, The Lynchburg News & Advance reported. The college has 605 students, but has room on campus for 750-800. Sweet Briar plans to cut the equivalent of 11 full-time faculty positions (though some of the cuts will be of part-timers), bringing the faculty size down to the equivalent of 85 full-time positions.
May 7, 2012
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on Friday released a report detailing academic fraud in a scandal set off by a report about inappropriate treatment received by a football player, The Raleigh News & Observer reported. The fraud involved inappropriate incidents in 50 classes, ranging from faculty members who didn't show up to unauthorized grade changes for students.
May 7, 2012
Rutgers University charges its students nearly $1,000 each a year -- more than the charges at any other university -- to finance football, Bloomberg reported. The total comes from an analysis by the news service based on student fees and direct university funding for the football program.
May 7, 2012
A majority of voting faculty members approved resolutions recently of no confidence in the presidents of Wilkes University and the University of Southern Maine. At Southern Maine, a vote of no confidence requires the backing of two-thirds of all faculty members to pass, and while the measure won the support of 194 faculty members (with 88 opposed), it needed 251 votes to officially pass.
May 7, 2012
The following colleges and universities have announced their commencement speakers for spring 2012:
May 7, 2012
Educators and some political leaders in Australia are concerned about a sharp decline in the study of Indonesia, The Age reported. Many in Australia have hoped that its proximity to Indonesia could, with greater knowledge of the country, provide an economic edge as economic growth in the area takes off. Instead, the opposite seems to be taking place, with a 37 percent decline in university enrollments in Indonesian in the last decade.
May 7, 2012
In today’s Academic Minute, Jason Kring of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University describes the known and unknown challenges of long-term space flight. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

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