Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

November 28, 2012
Irving Gottesman is being named today as the winner of the 2013 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology. The award is worth $100,000. Gottesman's research explores the basis of schizophrenia and the way mental disorders are classified. He is the retired Irving and Dorothy Bernstein professor of adult psychiatry at University of Minnesota, and also is Sherrell J. Aston professor of psychology emeritus at University of Virginia.  
November 28, 2012
One painting in an exhibit at Bunker Hill Community College's art gallery is drawing a lot of outrage and praise, The Boston Globe reported. The exhibit is of art inspired by the 2012 presidential campaign, and the painting in question depicts Obama as Jesus.  Michael D’Antuono, the artist, told the Globe that he is not suggesting that Obama is Jesus, but that he wanted to comment on the extent to which the president's critics have "crucified" him.  
November 28, 2012
The University of Tulsa on Tuesday suspended its new athletics director, Ross M. Parmley, amid a federal investigation into whether he is linked to a man under federal indictment for running an illegal gambling operation, The Oklahoman reported. Parmley has admitted to federal authorities that he bet on college and professional games for years before quitting gambling in 2010. At that time, he worked for Tulsa's athletics department, but had yet to become its director.  
November 28, 2012
A survey by the College Board has found that most school counselors do not feel that they have been sufficiently trained in competencies that would allow them to provide the best guidance to students on the college admissions process.
November 28, 2012
California Governor Jerry Brown, a Democrat, used his power as a member of the University of California Board of Regents to vote against the $486,800 salary for the new chancellor of the University of California at Berkeley, the Associated Press reported. The salary for Nicholas Dirks was approved on an 11-3 vote.
November 27, 2012
Two Kentucky newspapers -- The Herald-Leader and The Courier-Journal -- recently obtained open records showing that the reported attendance at University of Kentucky football games far exceeded what some people would consider actual attendance (the number of actual tickets scanned at each game). When the journalists attempted to find the data for the last home game, they found that they couldn't get it.
November 27, 2012
Alabama State University's board has placed its president, in office only since September, on leave, Alabama.com reported. Citing various press reports in the state, the article said that the president, Joseph Silver, said he was being forced out because he had tried to fire two officials for insubordination. One of those officials has now been named interim president.  
November 27, 2012
In today’s Academic Minute, Jeremy Green of King’s College London explains how Alan Turing’s mathematical genius continues to guide scientists more than fifty years after his death. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.  

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