Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

January 4, 2013
The Dutch education ministry wants to ban universities from investing in derivatives, Times Higher Education reported. Derivatives have become a popular financial strategy for many Dutch universities, but the government fears that twists in the economy could leave the universities in a highly vulnerable position because of the reliance on these investments.  
January 4, 2013
David Coleman, the new president of the College Board, last year gave a speech (related to his prior position as co-leader of the effort to write the Common Core State Standards, and not serving at the College Board) in which he offered strong criticism of the SAT, The Washington Post reported.
January 4, 2013
In today’s Academic Minute, Taya Cohen of Carnegie Mellon University reveals why our moral nature may depend on our response to guilt. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
January 4, 2013
Data presented at economics meeting show the long-term shifts in the way black and white students are educated -- and suggest that affirmative action bans may increase desegregation by some measures.
January 4, 2013
At MLA meeting, amid the frenzy and disappointment about lack of positions, some new Ph.D.s discuss paths to good careers (even if not those they once envisioned). Are grad programs providing any help?
January 4, 2013
Gerda Lerner, considered one of the pioneers of women's history, died Wednesday at the age of 92. An obituary in The New York Times detailed her career, much of which was spent at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. She focused on the history of women in the United States when such a focus was highly unusual among historians. In 1972, when Lerner was teaching at Sarah Lawrence College, she created a master's degree in women's history -- the first graduate degree in the field.
January 4, 2013
The Association of American Universities on Thursday issued a statement backing reform of gun laws in the United States. While calling for reform of gun laws, the statement also calls for improvements in the treatment of mental illness and consideration of the "culture of contemporary media" in promoting violence. "We claim no special expertise in these domains," the statement says, but it calls for a comprehensive solution to gun violence, noting the tragedies at Virginia Tech and in Newtown, Conn.  
January 4, 2013
Many big-time college football programs use a generic version of the pain-relief drug Toradol to treat players -- despite evidence that its use could lead to possible fatal heart attacks, strokes or organ failure, ABC News reported. Of top programs, only the University of Oklahoma and the University of Nebraska at Lincoln told ABC News that they have limited or stopped the use of the drug.  

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