Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

November 18, 2011
The U.S. Government Accountability Office on Thursday issued a report finding that the Education Department lacks sufficient data on distance education programs to adequately perform oversight functions on the use of federal aid. While the Education Department's National Center for Education Statistics is starting to collect more data, the GAO found that oversight units in the department do not yet have a plan for using that data.  
November 18, 2011
LSU ends a major scholarship program for alumni children -- deciding it can no longer afford to favor a group based on birth instead of need or ability.
November 18, 2011
Anthropologists debate whether their discipline is divided into humanities and science tribes, and wonder why they can’t all get along.
November 18, 2011
The University of Missouri is considering a policy under which students at the system's campuses would be required to obtain written permission from professors before taping their classes, the Associated Press reported.
November 18, 2011
In today’s Academic Minute, Stuart Gaffin of Columbia University explains how the colors and materials used by urban planners can reduce the higher temperatures associated with global climate change. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.  
November 18, 2011
Faculty members at two campuses of the California State University System -- Dominguez Hills and East Bay -- held one-day strikes on Thursday, The San Jose Mercury News reported. The faculty members are frustrated by slow progress in contract talks and by continued cuts to the university system's budget. University administrators say that they sympathize but lack the funds to meet the faculty members' demands.
November 18, 2011
Students at Queen's University in Canada have a reputation for being a little spoiled, a little rich and a little hedonistic, so a student comedy group made a parody of an admissions video playing up the stereotypes rather than trying to challenge them, Maclean's reported. The parody -- which might well work at many colleges -- is called "I Go to Queen's."
November 17, 2011
Scott Koerwer resigned last week as president of Newberry College, after serving less than 18 months in office, The State reported. A statement cited "personal and family reasons," and he immediately moved out of the presidential home. In an e-mail to the newspaper, he said he was working on some consulting projects.  
November 17, 2011
The average compensation for a big-time college football coach is $1.47 million this year, up 55 percent over the last six seasons, USA Today reported. The newspaper's study found that the pay in the six conferences that make up the Bowl Championship Series, the increase was roughly the same percentage, but on a larger base. The average salary in those conferences for a head football coach is $2.125 million.
November 17, 2011
Part of the Occupy Wall Street movement is planning to announce on Monday a campaign to encourage people repaying student loans to stop doing so. The idea is that people will pledge to stop repaying their loans when 1 million people agree to do so. The hope is that such a volume of non-repayment would make it difficult to punish those who opt to stop paying. The repayments could continue, however, if certain conditions are met. Those conditions include making public higher education free to students.

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