Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

October 8, 2012
Cardale Jones, a third-string quarterback at Ohio State University, tweeted on Friday that athletes shouldn't need to attend class, ESPN reported. "Why should we have to go to class if we came here to play FOOTBALL, we ain't come to play SCHOOL classes are POINTLESS," he wrote. Once media organizations noticed and started to write about the tweet, it was removed, as was the entire Twitter account of Jones.
October 8, 2012
Clair Willcox was named Friday to his former job as editor-in-chief of the University of Missouri Press, The Columbia Missourian reported. In recent months, the press was slated for elimination and Willcox was laid off. When the press survived, supporters said that they would not be satisfied until Willcox's job was restored.
October 8, 2012
In today’s Academic Minute, Keith Ashley of the University of North Florida reveals what life was like for Native Americans at the earliest Spanish missions. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
October 8, 2012
John B. Gurdon of the University of Cambridge and Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University were this morning named joint winners of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Medicine "for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent." Yamanaka is also affiliated with the Gladstone Institutes, in San Francisco.    
October 8, 2012
Many students at Cuyahoga Community College are objecting to the decision of the college's Metro campus to refuse to let Maria Graciani continue her job as an "ambassador" -- in which she helped with orientation, campus tours and other activities -- because 16 years ago she was convicted of aggravated assault, The Plain Dealer of Cleveland reported.
October 8, 2012
The University of Texas at Austin has announced a pilot program to test the idea of linking loan forgiveness to progress made by undergraduates toward graduation. Under the program, the university will select 200 undergraduates who receive federal unsubsidized student loans. If they complete 15 credits in a semester, the university will repay $1,000 in principal, plus accrued interest.  
October 8, 2012
A video has surfaced in which Representative Paul Broun, a Georgia Republican who chairs the House Science Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, blasts widely accepted scientific theories, The Athens Banner-Herald reported. In the video address to a church, Representative Broun said that the Bible contains the literal truth about all matters, and that those who think otherwise are wrong. "God’s word is true. I’ve come to understand that.
October 8, 2012
As colleges' waitlists grow, admissions leaders debate just what rights applicants should have.
October 8, 2012
Emory University is formally acknowledging and apologizing for the first time for the anti-Jewish actions, many years ago, of its dental school, The New York Times reported. When the late John E. Buhler was dean, from 1948 to 1961, 65 percent of Jewish students were either failed or forced to repeat entire years of classes.
October 8, 2012
Students at Sana'a University in Yemen held protests last week to call for an end to political intrusions at the university, Yemen Times reported. Instructors are also protesting what they view as unfair treatment by the government. The protest comes amid debates over who should be appointed rector, and demands that military officials stay off of the campus.  

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