Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

January 27, 2014
The Christian Theological Seminary, in Indiana, has announced a "sustainability plan" that involves buyouts to faculty members while looking for partnerships with other institutions and developing new financial strategies. While not detailed in the announcement, the buyouts could substantially change the nature of the institution. Some concerned students have heard rumors that essentially all faculty members are being asked to accept deals.
January 27, 2014
New petition seeks to organize academics who oppose boycotts and outside attacks (whether from supporters or critics of Israel) on the tenure candidacies of faculty members.
January 27, 2014
West Virginia, like many states, provides college presidents with charge cards. But unlike other states, West Virginia exempts the presidents from rules about what they can charge, The Gazette-Mail reported. As examples of what a president can charge (but other state officials could not), the article noted these charges by Brian Hemphill, president of West Virginia State University: Chicago Bears football tickets, a $416 dinner and multiple alcohol and room service charges.
January 24, 2014
The University of Michigan Board of Regents today named Mark S. Schlissel as the institution's next president. Schlissel is provost of Brown University. Before being named provost at Brown in 2011, he was dean of biological sciences at the University of California at Berkeley, where he also held the C.H. Li Chair in Biochemistry. He will succeed Mary Sue Coleman on July 1. Coleman is retiring after 12 years as president at Michigan.  
January 24, 2014
John Lippincott announced Thursday that he will retire as president of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education a year from now. He has been president of the association since 2004, having previously served as vice president for communications and marketing at CASE and associate vice chancellor for advancement at the University System of Maryland.  
January 24, 2014
In today’s Academic Minute, Thomas Sawicki of American Public University describes the discovery of a number of new species in the subterranean caves of Florida. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.  
January 24, 2014
Facing enrollment declines, Iowa Wesleyan College plans to close about half of its academic programs and to shrink its faculty, The Gazette reported. The jobs of  22 of 52 professors and 23 of 78 staff members will be eliminated. The college will also eliminate 16 of 32 major programs, including studio art, sociology, history, philosophy of religion, communication and mass communication, and forensic science.
January 24, 2014
Brandeis University announced Thursday that it paid Jehuda Reinharz, its former president, $4.9 million this month. The funds were due to Reinharz for deferred compensation and sabbaticals that he did not take during his presidency, a Brandeis statement said. The university has been under intense criticism from many students and faculty members over high payments to Reinharz.

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