Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

November 3, 2011
An Ivy Tech Community College faculty member died Wednesday after falling from a tower where he was teaching students wind turbine technology, The Courier and Journal reported. Classes were canceled for the rest of the day. The cause of the fall has yet to be determined.  
November 3, 2011
Clatsop Community College, in Oregon, announced that 15 of the 39 full-time faculty members will lose their jobs after the spring term, The Daily Astorian reported. The college will lose about $1 million in state funds that it expected this year, and college leaders say the layoffs will save more than $300,000, closing the institution's deficit gap.
November 2, 2011
Colorado voters on Tuesday rejected a referendum that would have, for five years, restored certain taxes cut in recent years, and designated the revenue gained to support schools and colleges. The Denver Post reported that, with 61 percent of precincts reporting, the measure was attracting support from only 35 percent of voters.  

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