Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

January 25, 2012
About one-third of South Korean universities have announced tuition cuts, The Korea Herald reported. The government has been urging the cuts, in a year in which student aid is being increased, to make higher education more affordable for Korean families.
January 25, 2012
Jan. 25, 2012 -- The 2011-12 Inside Higher Ed Survey of College & University Chief Academic Officers is the fourth in a series of surveys of senior campus officials about key, time-sensitive issues in higher education. The article can be found here, and the survey report can be viewed here. Inside Higher Ed collaborated on this project with Kenneth C. Green, founding director of the Campus Computing Project. The Inside Higher Ed survey of academic officers was made possible in part by the generous financial support of Datatel+SGHE, Epsilen, McGraw-Hill Higher Education and Waypoint Outcomes. On Feb. 15, Inside Higher Ed presented a free webinar to discuss the results of the CAO survey and their implications for higher education. To view a recording of the webinar, please click here.
January 24, 2012
The presidents of Ireland's existing universities are objecting to a plan to create a new, technologically oriented university, but they are also denying that they are elitists, The Irish Times reported. The proposed new university would combine smaller technology institutes, and proponents say that the plan would improve the education provided to students.
January 24, 2012
Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick is proposing a centralization of community colleges in Massachusetts. His plan would give the state's Board of Higher Education authority over all funds for all community colleges, consolidating the 15 line items for the colleges in the budget today. Further, Patrick said that the board would focus on job preparation.
January 24, 2012
Pepperdine University has, for the fourth time, rejected a request from a gay-straight student alliance to be recognized. A petition, signed by nearly 4,000 people as of Tuesday morning, said that the university needed to accept the organization. "Pepperdine students often struggle to be honest about their sexual orientation because they fear rejection from their peers as well as the risk of losing their scholarships and leadership opportunities," the petition says.
January 24, 2012
California State University trustees on Tuesday rejected a request by a legislator that they hold off on a plan that would lead to significant increases in what some campus presidents are paid, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. The plan would group Cal State campuses by mission and enrollment, and then set salary ranges based on peer institutions.
January 24, 2012
Trudie Kibbe Reed is stepping down as president of Bethune-Cookman University, amid apparent board disagreements over whether her resignation should be accepted. The Daytona Beach News-Journal reported her departure, confirmed by the board chair.
January 24, 2012
The American Philosophical Association has announced that, starting in 2015-16, the annual meeting of its Eastern Division will no longer take place in the week between Christmas and New Year's Day, but will instead take place at the end of the first full week of January. Meetings during the post-Christmas week were in the past a tradition for many humanities scholars, as the Modern Language Association, like the philosophers, met that week. The theory was that one could get good deals at conference hotels, and nobody would have classes scheduled.

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