Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

To reach this person, click here.

Most Recent Articles

October 26, 2018
Marist College announced Thursday that it will be the new home of the Mind-Set List, the annual start-of-the-academic-year list of things that (traditional-age) freshmen know or don't know, based on their life experiences. The list was created at Beloit College in 1998 and attracts headlines every fall.
October 26, 2018
Cheddar, a streaming video company, has purchased Rate My Professors, the site that is influential with students and widely criticized by educators. A statement from Cheddar is promising improvements in the site to "offer students a better toolset to search, evaluate and compare professors." Viacom has owned Rate My Professors.
October 26, 2018
Ho Ka Terence Yung pleaded guilty in federal court to charges that he engaged in 18 months of cyberstalking and making false accusations against an alumnus of Georgetown University's law school who interviewed him as part of the admissions process and recommended he be rejected, which he was, Delaware Online reported.
October 25, 2018
The University of Texas/Texas A&M Investment Management Company, known as UTIMCO, has announced that it is adding scrutiny of any investments with ties to countries that are under U.S. sanctions. Those countries include Iran, North Korea, Russia, Sudan and Syria. A statement from UTIMCO said that the review could lead to the sales of some investments, but that no major impact was expected on the fund.
October 25, 2018
New York University's decision to offer full-tuition scholarships to all medical students has prompted considerable discussion.
October 25, 2018
A new study by the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis shows that federal aid to low-income students, as opposed to all students, offers significant economic payoff to the country. The study notes that providing enough aid to low-income students is expensive, but finds that "the economic optimum is achieved when financial aid is strictly directed to students from low-income households.
October 24, 2018
Augusta University, in Georgia, is starting a bachelor of science in cybersecurity engineering. Carnegie Mellon University is starting a master's program in automated science biological experimentation.
October 24, 2018
Undergraduates are more likely to consider going to graduate school if at least one of their parents did so, according to new data from the Association of American Law Schools and Gallup. The survey found that 41 percent of those considering graduate or professional education have at least one parent with an advanced degree, compared to 33 percent whose parents hold a bachelor’s degree and 26 percent whose parents do not hold a four-year degree.
October 24, 2018
Pau Volcker, former Federal Reserve chairman, has long been seen as a leading guru on economics and public policy. In an interview with The New York Times marking the publication of his memoirs, Volcker was generally pessimistic about trends in the world, and also included some pointed criticism of the public policy programs at Harvard and Princeton Universities (though he is a graduate and once taught at the latter).

Pages

Back to Top