Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

September 12, 2012
Amy Bishop has reached a plea agreement to resolve the charges that she murdered three of her colleagues in the biology department of the University of Alabama at Huntsville, The Huntsville Times reported. Under the agreement, she entered a guilty plea in one of the murder counts, and also admitted that she tried to kill three others. The agreement means she will spend the rest of her life in prison, but spares her the death penalty.    
September 12, 2012
The annual college rankings of U.S. News & World Report are out today, with only one change in methodology. The two most recent years of guidance counselor surveys, rather than just one year of data, will be used to calculate the counselors' ratings. The participation of college presidents in the survey (by filling out reports on the reputations of other colleges) is up a bit this year, if still way behind the two-thirds participation levels of a decade ago. For the new edition, 44 percent of all presidents participated, up from 43 percent a year ago.
September 11, 2012
Matt Kupec, vice chancellor for university advancement at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, resigned Sunday after being told of an investigation into whether he and another development official had been taking personal trips paid for by the university, The News & Observer reported. The trips appeared to be to watch a son of the other employee play college basketball games. The other official -- Tami Hansbrough, a major gifts officer -- has been placed on leave.
September 11, 2012
Florida A&M University is defending itself in a wrongful death lawsuit by the parents of a student who died in the middle of hazing by the marching band by saying that it was the student's fault he participated, The Orlando Sentinel reported.
September 11, 2012
In today’s Academic Minute, Janet Currie of Princeton University reveals the link between a woman’s exposure to stress during pregnancy and the probability of experiencing complications during labor and delivery. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.  
September 11, 2012
The Middle East Studies Association of North American has written to senior Iranian officials asking them to stop official newspapers from attacking the International Society for Iranian Studies. That group typically holds its annual meeting in North America, but this August held its 2012 meeting in Istanbul, with the goal of allowing more scholars in Iran to participate.
September 11, 2012
Demand to earn an M.B.A. isn't what it once was, and top business schools are as a result seeing declines in applications, The Wall Street Journal reported. For the class that just entered, Columbia University's applications were down 19 percent, the University of Michigan was off by 17 percent and Yale was down 10 percent.  
September 11, 2012
Colorado Supreme Court rejects his appeal in decision that some faculty leaders see as danger to academic freedom -- but that some college associations argue is essential to academic freedom.
September 11, 2012
The University of Rochester has announced that it will no longer require all undergraduate applicants to submit either the SAT or ACT, but they will still have to submit some test. Others that might be used include the SAT subject exams, Advanced Placement tests or International Baccalaureate tests.
September 11, 2012
Two House of Representatives committees announced a joint hearing Wednesday on the National Labor Relations Board's agenda in higher education. Congressional Republicans have frequently clashed with the NLRB on issues outside of higher education.

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