Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

November 29, 2010
Threat by two engineering professors at Ryerson U. revives debate over how to respond to rude students.
November 24, 2010
Furman University is starting an undergraduate major in sustainability science.Georgian Court University is starting a master's program in homeland security.Saint Leo University
November 23, 2010
In something of a turnabout, admissions professionals recently had the chance to rank U.S. News & World Report for its college rankings -- and let's just say that the magazine was judged at about the equivalent of the dreaded "third tier" in its evaluations.
November 23, 2010
The blog of the Faculty Association of the University of California at Los Angeles features a video, labeled "a little self-sufficient music" -- the Supremes singing "Stop in the Name of Love." The clip starts not with the famous title line of the song, but with the refrain: "Think it o-o-ver."
November 22, 2010
A special issue of The Journal of Electronic Publishing being released today features a series of calls for change in the way university presses are run -- suggesting that the current business model is collapsing.The essays in the journal argue that the strategy of bolstering the existing model of selling print versions of monographs is doomed to fail, even if many advocates for scholarly publishing have defended it amid the economic and technological changes of the last decade.
November 22, 2010
Duke University is starting an M.F.A.
November 19, 2010
With some regularity, the mainstream press seems to love to scare would-be college students and parents with stories about how one may be more likely to be hit by lightning than win admission to an Ivy university or a prominent flagship. True?
November 19, 2010
George Washington University is starting an M.F.A. for mid-career dancers, performers and choreographers to allow them to refine individual style, technique and repertoire.Middlesex Community College, in Massachusetts, is starting a nursing assistant certificate program.The Vermont College of Fine Arts is starting new M.F.A. degrees in graphic design and music composition.
November 18, 2010
Courts continue to zig-zag on warrantless searches of college dormitory rooms -- with the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts on Wednesday rejecting the use of drug evidence found in 2007 in the room of two students at Boston College. The ruling by the highest court in Massachusetts reverses an appeals court ruling last year that upheld the use of the evidence.
November 17, 2010
Four years ago, momentum appeared to be growing for competitive colleges to eliminate programs in which some high school students applied early and found out early whether they were admitted -- sometimes with the requirement that they commit to enroll if admitted. In a single month in 2006, Harvard and Princeton Universities and then the University of Virginia announced that they were eliminating early admissions programs, which critics said favored wealthy students.

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