Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

November 18, 2008
Jess H. Lord, dean of admissions and financial aid at Haverford College, says that "up until Friday I've been telling anyone who would listen to me to get ready because I assumed ED numbers would drop." He said it was "absolutely my assumption that ED would be hit hard by the economy -- that applying ED would be seen as a luxury and folks would hold off." "ED" is admissions lingo for early decision, in which applicants apply early and pledge, if admitted, to enroll.
November 17, 2008
After you've been called racist by some students, can you sue to get your reputation back?
November 14, 2008
U. of Iowa is stunned by second case this year of a professor facing sexual harassment allegations killing himself.
November 13, 2008
AAUP finds concerns about due process and academic freedom in case of mathematics instructor let go after 12 years of work.
November 13, 2008
At Texas A&M International, an instructor told students he would fail and publicly humiliate them if they engaged in academic dishonesty. They did and he did -- so the university fired him.

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