Scott Jaschik

Scott Jaschik, Editor, is one of the three founders of Inside Higher Ed. With Doug Lederman, he leads the editorial operations of Inside Higher Ed, overseeing news content, opinion pieces, career advice, blogs and other features. Scott is a leading voice on higher education issues, quoted regularly in publications nationwide, and publishing articles on colleges in publications such as The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, Salon, and elsewhere. He has been a judge or screener for the National Magazine Awards, the Online Journalism Awards, the Folio Editorial Excellence Awards, and the Education Writers Association Awards. Scott served as a mentor in the community college fellowship program of the Hechinger Institute on Education and the Media, of Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a member of the board of the Education Writers Association. From 1999-2003, Scott was editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education. Scott grew up in Rochester, N.Y., and graduated from Cornell University in 1985. He lives in Washington.

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Most Recent Articles

September 2, 2008
A federal judge last week struck down a Florida law barring public university professors from using either state or private funds to travel to Cuba, The Miami Herald reported. The judge struck down only the part of the law pertaining to non-state funds, but since most professors who conduct work in Cuba do not use state funds, the ruling should permit most of that work to resume.
September 2, 2008
Initial audit finds problems with 10 percent of the executive MBA's awarded by the university.
September 2, 2008
Nicholls State University is located in Thibodaux, La., about 20 miles from where the center of Hurricane Gustav hit land Monday morning. And Nicholls State may illustrate both the progress made by Gulf colleges and universities since Katrina three years ago, and the uncertainty with any natural disaster.
September 2, 2008
In 2006, the University of California at Los Angeles faced intense criticism when only 2 percent of the students admitted for the freshman class were black. For a decade at that point, UCLA had been operating under a ban on considering race and ethnicity in admissions decisions, but the numbers for black students had not previously been so low.
September 2, 2008
Key philanthropic and government programs offering grants for Ph.D. students appear to be excluding proposals for graduate students in sociology and political science, while favoring proposals from those in history, anthropology and a range of relatively small disciplines, such as art history and ethnomusicology, according to data released Friday.
August 29, 2008
Political scientists debate whether one of the discipline's traditional specializations has outlived its purpose and is hindering good research and teaching.
August 29, 2008
After 18 years leading colleges, Roger Martin decided to enroll as a freshman at St. John's -- to experience the liberal arts in a pure form, and to join the crew team.
August 29, 2008
Political science association seeks compromise on -- and continues to face criticism over -- its decision to go to New Orleans, and debates how political the group should be.
August 29, 2008
Many Louisiana colleges are closing early today and some are planning to stay closed until next Wednesday or Thursday to encourage students and employees to evacuate in anticipation of Gustav landing in the state. Delgado Community College is ending all classes at noon today and hasn't yet decided on a schedule for next week. Loyola University New Orleans is requiring students to evacuate the campus tomorrow.
August 28, 2008
The board of the University of Central Arkansas has scheduled a last-minute meeting today to discuss the future of the presidency of Lu Hardin, who has been under fire for a secret approval of a $300,000 bonus that he has already repaid, the Associated Press reported. The Arkansas Times reported that the board may approve a buyout for Hardin.

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