Serena Golden

Serena Golden, Associate Editor, joined Inside Higher Ed in 2008. She is a 2007 graduate of Reed College, where she earned a B.A. in English. Before coming to Inside Higher Ed, she was a research associate at a hedge fund and an editorial and research intern at CQ Press.

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Most Recent Articles

June 3, 2010
Discussion of -- and complaints about -- the rise of "helicopter parents," whose involvement in their children's lives lies somewhere between excessive and obsessive, has reached a fever pitch over the past few years.
May 28, 2010
For people who never joined a Greek letter society, thinking about fraternities tends to evoke "Animal House," alcohol-fueled college parties, or perhaps news stories about the tragic consequences of hazing -- although those in academe, of course, may have a more varied set of associations. Laurie A.
May 21, 2010
WASHINGTON -- Jonathan Spence came here to deliver a speech, but don't let that fool you: his address -- the 39th Annual Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities, which took place Thursday -- in no way resembled the sort typically associated with D.C.
May 13, 2010
Call it "Cullen's Law": If it exists, there is a Twilight spin on it. No exceptions -- and that includes academe. Yes, though it may run counter to the prevalent stereotype of Twilight's audience (14 years old, misguided, breathless), a growing number of scholars are eager to offer their perspectives on the hugely popular novels and the cultural phenomenon they've engendered.
May 12, 2010
Stop me if you’ve heard this one: an academic novel, set at a fictional (but prestigious) American research university, portrays tenured faculty who are indolent but querulous; students whose main activities include protesting, avoiding classes, and popping pills; and an administration that’s disorganized, secretive, and ineffectual. Money and status are the primary concerns of professors and administrators alike; the community as a whole is characterized by lassitude and petty squabbling, while education is of minimal importance to anyone.
May 7, 2010
Ten years ago, Jean Yu-wen Shen Wu co-edited Asian American Studies: A Reader (Rutgers University Press), an anthology intended to introduce readers to the discipline.
April 29, 2010
Remedial education has long been a political football on campus -- and far beyond.
April 16, 2010
Anthropology may loosely be defined as the study of human culture -- but throughout the discipline's history, some cultures have been deemed more worthy of study than others. Who determines which cultures merit the most study -- and how, and why?
April 9, 2010
WASHINGTON -- The session, here at the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians, was entitled “The Uses and Abuses of New Deal History” – but there was no question that those on the panel were more concerned with the latter. Their general tone, which seemed to be shared by those in the audience, was one of frustration; of anger at Republican lawmakers -- who, according to the panelists, are determined to repeat the same errors that brought about the Great Depression -- and dismay that so many Americans seem to be amenable to the idea.
March 30, 2010
Many of us may associate archaeology with excavations in faraway lands, assuming that the discipline's real work takes place far outside the classroom. But more and more universities are now discovering that there is real -- and vital -- archaeology to be done in their own backyards... and front yards. And quads.

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