Tracy Mitrano

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November 30, 2012
Remember the movie "Sex, Lies and Videotape"?  I invoke its poetic meter to frame a discussion of civil action privacy law.  Type 4, you will recall, involves civil actions, individuals against individuals, in state court actions known as "torts."  These laws, famously framed out of a 1890 law review article, were the first time the term "privacy" came directly into named U.S. laws.  Putting on my historian's hat, I have argued that this occurrence was not the result of a notion of privacy being "discovered" -- notions of privacy date back to ancient times in Western Culture, and the term itself is derived from Latin -- but because modern, urban, industrial society at the turn of the last century, driven largely by technological developments, not the least of which was photography, encroached so significantly on cultural mores that the law was called upon as a defense to shore up those norms.
November 29, 2012
Yesterday the World Wide Web Consortium named privacy expert and the Ohio State University Law Professor Peter Swire Co-Chair of its Tracking Protection Working Group. With a stellar reputation and a mountain of integrity, Swire's appointment is as good a move as anyone can hope for in what is a technically complicated and politically contentious situation.
November 28, 2012
This week the Senate Judiciary Committee will work on amendments to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, commonly referred to as "ECPA."  When passed in 1986 it updated the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, the first "wiretap" federal law.  This law codified procedures for the rule the Supreme Court established in the landmark Katz v. U.S. case that created a Fourth Amendment privacy right in electronic communications, telephony principally in that day.  In my cheat sheet on different kinds of privacy law outlined in the last couple of previous blogs, this would be type 2 privacy law.
November 26, 2012
It is a title designed to catch attention, but the content has the purpose of drawing an important similarity to what most take as a distinction.
November 25, 2012
With the holiday in the rearview mirror, I had time to reflect on the four categories of privacy law proffered in the last blog. One more came to mind as I was driving up I 95 near D.C., appropriately so, because it is about administrative law.  Allow me, for the record, to copy and paste the ones that I included in the last blog and add this one to it, with a little description.  It matters because administrative law may come to play a more significant role in governance of Internet companies that either the legislature or the judiciary.
November 15, 2012
In a working group list service, some of the privacy professional around higher education have been enjoying a lively discussion about "privacy."  This blog is a good place to share thoughts to all of you.
November 13, 2012
For the last few days reading about the Petraeus case I knew it was only a matter of time before commentators would ring the privacy bell. This afternoon the NYT published the first of what will undoubtedly become many comments.
November 10, 2012
For the first time in ten years, I was able to devote my entire week to the EDUCAUSE National Conference.  Allow me to share some take-aways from the experience.
November 5, 2012
With its headquarters in the Boulder area and many a national conference in Denver, Colorado is EDUCAUSE country!  It is great to be back here for another stunning national convention!
November 2, 2012
Business intelligence is all the go these days, and increasingly confused with information management.  People are wondering what these functions are exactly, whether they are the same or could be located in the same office.  Short answer: no.  Longer answer: Read on.

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