Wick Sloane

Wick Sloane, an end user of higher education, began his first piece for Inside Higher Ed, "Somehow I missed the meeting where the nation decided to exit public higher education. I was, after all, chief financial officer of a public university." He has gone on to prod and poke and propose ways that the nation, with colleges and universities that proclaim themselves "the best higher education system in the world," can provide just that education to the millions of students who still cannot afford an education. His first column was adapted from a speech he gave at a higher education conference at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, where he was a visiting fellow for higher education finance. In education, Wick has been a trustee of an independent school, an elected member of a public school system, and chief financial officer of a Research I public university. Finding that the debates on access were lacking good data on the needs of low-income students, Wick has embedded himself at Bunker Hill Community College in Boston, where he teaches expository writing and does other odd jobs. With the support of the Center for College Accountability and Productivity, he published a paper, "The Undebated Billions," about federal tax subsidies to higher education, and Common Sense, modeled after the Thomas Paine pamphlet, arguing that the four-year bachelor's degree is obsolete. Six of his pieces for IHE were part of a fellowship to investigate community college financing that Wick won from the Hechinger Institute at Teachers College, Columbia University. He contribute columns to "What the Press Should Ask," for Nieman Watchdog, published by the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University. Wick holds degrees from the nation's most highly selective institutions of higher education, Williams College and Yale University. Therefore, by the standards of the academy itself, he must be right.

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Most Recent Articles

November 11, 2016
Wick Sloane presents Inside Higher Ed’s annual survey of veterans at highly selective colleges and universities. Columbia leads the pack, and there’s been progress, thanks to Posse and other groups. But over all? “A national disgrace,” says one critic.
October 25, 2016
For all President Obama, Jill Biden and Martha Kanter have done for the institutions, Wick Sloane offers his thanks. Now it's up to the colleges themselves, he writes.
October 3, 2016
The health and welfare of low-income college students is a national emergency, Wick Sloane argues, which is why Secretary Burwell and her agency should take responsibility for them.
April 29, 2016
Wick Sloane wonders if filling an auditorium to discuss the problem of campus hunger and homelessness is progress -- and if screaming would make a difference.
January 7, 2016
Wick Sloane describes the toll that what we now call food insecurity is taking on students at campuses like his.
November 11, 2015
Wick Sloane's annual Veterans Day survey of highly ranked private colleges shows signs of progress amid the usual (major) disappointments.
April 17, 2015
As community college leaders gather for their annual meeting, Wick Sloane asks them to advocate more aggressively for their needy (and often hungry) students.
November 11, 2014
In his annual survey of the nation's wealthiest and most selective colleges, Wick Sloane finds most of them are doing little to enroll the men and women who serve in the military.
August 22, 2014
After another year in the trenches, Wick Sloane gives himself a failing grade on changing his students' lives (and policy makers' minds).
December 20, 2013
Many college students go hungry. Wick Sloane's higher ed reform plan: Give every Pell Grant student a peanut butter and jelly sandwich each day.

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