Views

Views

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Views
July 28, 2015
A faculty member recounts feeling that she couldn't complain about an event that humiliated her and other female professors, but was viewed as "good fun" by many others.
July 27, 2015
Stephen L. Chew writes that current approaches -- for awards or tenure and promotion -- are based too much on passion or student enjoyment and not enough on actual learning.

Views Columnists

Blogs

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Blog U
July 28, 2015 - 3:00am
In marketing your institution to today's teens, think beyond flashy images on your home page and focus on academic programs.
July 27, 2015 - 9:26pm
and how to avoid them.
July 27, 2015 - 9:00pm
Coming to terms with our technology lock-in.

Archive

November 27, 2006
Asked to examine problems in college sports, committee of presidents blames the other guys, the professors, writes Tom Palaima.
November 22, 2006
The guy featured on the poster had a long white beard and dark black sunglasses, the kind worn by people too cool for any room they might ever enter. At first it looked like he might be the guitar player for ZZ Top. But on closer examination you saw that the event being advertised was not a rock concert but, rather, a "transdisciplinary celebration" called "Why Melville Matters Now.” The man behind those shades was the creator of tortured souls like Ishmael and Bartleby.
November 22, 2006
Wick Sloane, already a nominee for the Harvard job, explains what he'd do if tapped for the still open position at one of America's great public universities.
November 21, 2006
"I wasn't anybody's superior."             --Amélie, in Fear and Trembling One way to characterize work in higher education: It has no bosses. The boss-ridden business world that strikes such glacial terror in the recent movie, The Devil Wears Prada or such giggly absurdity in the current television series, "The Office," is not our world. Miranda Priestly as a dean? No department chair (or provost) would tolerate her. Michael Scott as a department chair? The faculty would just watch him implode.
November 20, 2006
Michigan's abolition of affirmative action doesn't end colleges' responsibility to promote diversity; it only changes the tactics, writes Russell Olwell.

Pages

Search for Jobs

Most

  • Viewed
  • Commented
  • Past:
  • Day
  • Week
  • Month
  • Year
Back to Top