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January 16, 2019
Machine learning and artificial intelligence carry inherent risks to colleges and universities and their students -- but only if the people making the decisions fail to exert control over the tools’ influence, Fred Singer argues.
January 16, 2019
Wayne Stauffer explains why he believes it's all about students' misplaced desire for choice.
January 15, 2019
Learning how to make technically accurate, interesting and honest images and graphics of science should be part of every scientist’s education, argues Felice C. Frankel.

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January 16, 2019
When aid packages don't add up.
January 16, 2019
Thinking throught the Peer Review system, especially for first time writers.
January 16, 2019
Why the online program management industry must adopt academic norms of critical self-evaluation.

Archive

July 8, 2011
Every so often, one scholar will assess another’s book so harshly that it becomes legendary. The most durable example must be A.E. Housman, whose anti-blurbs retain their sting after a century and more. Housman is best-known for the verse in his collection A Shropeshire Lad (1896). But classicists still remember his often pointed reviews of other philologists’ editions of ancient poetry, and can sometimes quote snippets from memory.
July 7, 2011
While experts focus on paying for the projects, Eric Jansson wonders if they need to be rethought to reflect trends in teaching and technology.
July 6, 2011
Her college's choice for its common reading for freshmen prompts Carolyn Foster Segal to ask: What is the point?
July 5, 2011
Daniel J. Ennis shares the query that is always asked.
July 5, 2011
Mega conclaves of humanities scholars have outlived their purpose, writes Rob Weir.

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