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September 19, 2018
The digital communication platform gives students more ways to interact with instructors and one another and can breathe life into the online classroom, Kathleen Kole de Peralta and Sarah Robey write.
September 19, 2018
Asking everyone their preferred personal pronoun is not a good idea, argues Rachel N. Levin.
September 18, 2018
The need to sell higher education and the liberal arts is real, and there should be no shame in that, argue Leonard Cassuto and Robin L. Cautin.

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September 19, 2018
Taking a look at the cool things grad students are doing in the world.
September 18, 2018
A frustration with earnings data.  

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July 8, 2011
Every so often, one scholar will assess another’s book so harshly that it becomes legendary. The most durable example must be A.E. Housman, whose anti-blurbs retain their sting after a century and more. Housman is best-known for the verse in his collection A Shropeshire Lad (1896). But classicists still remember his often pointed reviews of other philologists’ editions of ancient poetry, and can sometimes quote snippets from memory.
July 7, 2011
While experts focus on paying for the projects, Eric Jansson wonders if they need to be rethought to reflect trends in teaching and technology.
July 6, 2011
Her college's choice for its common reading for freshmen prompts Carolyn Foster Segal to ask: What is the point?
July 5, 2011
Daniel J. Ennis shares the query that is always asked.
July 5, 2011
Mega conclaves of humanities scholars have outlived their purpose, writes Rob Weir.

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