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August 23, 2019
Peter Martin's The Dictionary Wars: The American Fight Over the English Language shows Noah Webster as the sort of ideologue who's convinced he has a historical mission and carries himself accordingly, writes Scott McLemee.
August 22, 2019
Competition among the viewpoints of various observers, writes John Thelin, ultimately centers on a crucial question: Should academic searches be closed or open?
August 21, 2019
Imprisoned people are desperate to become students, and that desire and economics mandate that we heed their calls, argues Doran Larson.

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August 22, 2019
What can we do in the classroom to link the kind of thoughtful pause it takes to really understand something deeply with the practical skills to manage the constant flood of information?
August 22, 2019
Making the Community College transfer process more seamless and successfu
August 22, 2019
It’s likely not your students. But maybe it should be.

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February 3, 2005
"You're too young to know about the cafeterias," said Julius Jacobson. "The cafeterias were wonderful," said Phyllis Jacobson. "There's nothing like them today." "The cafeterias and the automats were the center of New York intellectual life back then," they continued. Each one finishing the other's thought, as old couples often will. "You'd buy a sandwich or a piece of pie, both if you could afford it, but what you really went there to do was talk." They talked. And I listened, hoping, as ever, to be transported into their past, at least for a while.
February 2, 2005
KC Johnson wants colleges to resist a new push to reform "liberal education."
February 1, 2005
As Scott McLemee introduces his new column, he feels a little bit like the fictional German philosopher created by Thomas Carlyle.
January 27, 2005
Beware the power of the syllabus, warns Terry Caesar. It defines not only the course, but also the role of the professor.
January 25, 2005
How short-sighted can this administration be?Answer: terribly and tragically.In the 2006 federal budget he will release in early February, President Bush is expected to propose killing off two programs, Upward Bound and Talent Search, that have helped millions of disadvantaged students prepare for college. This makes no long-term economic sense.

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