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October 30, 2020
Scott McLemee reviews Political Perversion: Rhetorical Aberration in the Time of Trumpeteering by Joshua Gunn.
October 30, 2020
Despite some excellent resources on this topic, the parts of our syllabi devoted to inclusion and accessibility remain somewhat, well, exclusive and inaccessible, argues Freya Möbus.
October 29, 2020
It's affecting them unequally, and here's what colleges can do, write Parissa J. Ballard, Mariah Kornbluh, Alison K. Cohen, Lindsay Till Hoyt, Melissa J. Hagan and Amanda L. Davis.

Blogs

October 30, 2020
Recruitment, selection effects revisited and situational tachycardia.
October 29, 2020
The primary goal during our pandemic period shouldn't be to return to face-to-face instruction. First order of business is to avoid disruption.
October 29, 2020
An instructor wonders: Which leaders from history will my students see as weak and strong?

Archive

April 28, 2005
A century after Upton Sinclair's The Jungle first appeared, a new edition of the novel proves wrenching.
April 27, 2005
  Minutes of the English Department Meeting, April 23, 2005 Meeting begins at 4:15 instead of 4:00 as scheduled because somebody forgot the keys to the faculty lounge.  The chair, Professor Bigley, brings the meeting to order. Professor Twistwhistle, our Renaissance scholar, remarks that today is Shakespeare’s birthday.
April 26, 2005
This week, America turns off the TV. Yeah, right, says Scott McLemee.
April 25, 2005
It has been heartening to witness the recent runaway success of Princeton emeritus Harry G. Frankfurt’s latest book, On Bullshit. First published as an essay in 1988, Frankfurt’s splendid study is largely an effort to distinguish between lies and bullshit. A liar, Frankfurt notes, acknowledges truth-systems yet tries to pass off information that is not true.
April 22, 2005
Michael Bugeja thinks about Shakespeare, the Internet, footnotes and scholarship -- on the eve of the Bard's birthday.

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