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October 30, 2020
Scott McLemee reviews Political Perversion: Rhetorical Aberration in the Time of Trumpeteering by Joshua Gunn.
October 30, 2020
Despite some excellent resources on this topic, the parts of our syllabi devoted to inclusion and accessibility remain somewhat, well, exclusive and inaccessible, argues Freya Möbus.
October 29, 2020
It's affecting them unequally, and here's what colleges can do, write Parissa J. Ballard, Mariah Kornbluh, Alison K. Cohen, Lindsay Till Hoyt, Melissa J. Hagan and Amanda L. Davis.

Blogs

October 30, 2020
Recruitment, selection effects revisited and situational tachycardia.
October 29, 2020
The primary goal during our pandemic period shouldn't be to return to face-to-face instruction. First order of business is to avoid disruption.
October 29, 2020
An instructor wonders: Which leaders from history will my students see as weak and strong?

Archive

April 12, 2005
Ask almost any American writer today for a list of his or her literary idols, and Frank Conroy’s name usually rises near the top. The author of one of the best books of our age, Stop-Time, published in 1967, as well as the director of the greatest incubator of literary talent ever assembled, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Conroy was as close to legend as any living writer gets. Not to mention a Grammy winner—for best liner notes. Despite a rough beginning, he made the most of a life that ended last week, when he died at age 69 of colon cancer.
April 11, 2005
An academic blogger talks about a new campaign to interest readers in fiction that they might otherwise miss.
April 8, 2005
Terry Caesar considers the allure of academic jobs in faraway locations.
April 7, 2005
The news of Saul Bellow's death sent me to the bookshelves, in search of (among other things) a set of interviews about his life and work that he gave 15 years ago. His answers were eloquent and cranky, occasionally at the same time; and taken all together, they form a major exhibit in what is now, for better or worse, the Saul Bellow Memorial Wing of my own literary education.
April 6, 2005
Michael Arnzen offers what he calls "behavior modification for the chronically tardy."

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