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September 23, 2020
Bruce H. Lindsey, recently deputy commander of the U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and Judith Wilde, a professor and former chief operating officer, provide three key tips for strategic crisis planning.
September 23, 2020
The pandemic has turned the spotlight onto what was an already glaring problem: what we've been teaching our arts students hasn't fully prepared them, argues Eric J. Lapin.
September 22, 2020
In a time of growing and increasingly complex challenges, too many top administrators, leadership teams and boards are focusing on tactics rather than strategy, writes Susan Resneck Pierce.

Blogs

September 23, 2020
Great to see Michael Chasen.
September 23, 2020
To think about …
September 23, 2020
Revolutionary change is possible within America’s democratic processes.

Archive

April 13, 2005
Freedom of speech is crucial both to a healthy democracy and the life of the mind. The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution prohibits Congress from any act that would abridge it and the charters of most of our colleges and universities recognize that freedom of thought and speech are essential to a healthy academic community.
April 12, 2005
Ask almost any American writer today for a list of his or her literary idols, and Frank Conroy’s name usually rises near the top. The author of one of the best books of our age, Stop-Time, published in 1967, as well as the director of the greatest incubator of literary talent ever assembled, the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Conroy was as close to legend as any living writer gets. Not to mention a Grammy winner—for best liner notes. Despite a rough beginning, he made the most of a life that ended last week, when he died at age 69 of colon cancer.
April 11, 2005
An academic blogger talks about a new campaign to interest readers in fiction that they might otherwise miss.
April 8, 2005
Terry Caesar considers the allure of academic jobs in faraway locations.
April 7, 2005
The news of Saul Bellow's death sent me to the bookshelves, in search of (among other things) a set of interviews about his life and work that he gave 15 years ago. His answers were eloquent and cranky, occasionally at the same time; and taken all together, they form a major exhibit in what is now, for better or worse, the Saul Bellow Memorial Wing of my own literary education.

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