University of Venus

University of Venus

GenX Women in Higher Ed, Writing from Across the Globe

April 24, 2011 - 9:15pm
This week is admitted student weekend across many campuses and I’ve been thinking about the relationship between Admissions and the Registrar’s Office.
April 21, 2011 - 8:15pm
My job didn’t exist three years ago. My institution is relatively new to offering free-standing master’s programs. Until recently we merely offered them jointly with another institution, and offered a few more out of the Faculty of Theology. In 2008 we launched 3 new master’s programs, followed by a fourth in 2009 and we’ve been steadily growing ever since, offering new streams as well as another one or two new programs to come within the next couple years. Doctoral programs will no doubt soon follow.
April 20, 2011 - 9:45pm
Neoliberalism, Managerialism, Commodification, Corporatization These seem to be the buzz-words in current critiques of higher education, education, and society in general. In the past couple of weeks, two articles on these topics struck both a personal and professional chord for me. One was an article by the Insecure Scholar in the Times Higher Education (UK) the other was an article in The Journal of Education Policy by Louise Archer (see details below). Both authors focused on how larger changes in higher education and society have real impacts on our daily lives.
April 19, 2011 - 8:15pm
The day I am writing this, I am sick. I was supposed to go to the Polish Consulate to do a visa application this morning, as I will be teaching at one of our partner Universities for a week there next month within the Erasmus Exchange Program. I woke up with a runny nose, sore throat, aching muscles and fever. Actually there were the signs that I was catching a cold or a virus or something by Saturday but I thought I would get over that quickly. I did not. So I could not go to the consulate to do my application and I called work and told them that I would not be able to come to work today.
April 17, 2011 - 9:00pm
I confess having a hesitation when deciding on the title of my post today. Should it be administrators OR teachers? Maybe even administrators VERSUS teachers? Of course the last alternative would be an exaggeration, but I dare you to say that it never felt that there was such a tension at your university. I went with the conjunction AND because in the end this is what I’d like to discuss: the relationship between these two groups of hard working people that make universities go round.
April 14, 2011 - 9:45pm
My older daughter, who is in kindergarten, is one of the gentlest souls I know. She goes around our house picking lady bugs off the floor and putting them on window sills so that we don’t crush them when we walk. A few days ago, while in the girls’ bathroom at school, she was kicked by another girl, between her legs. As soon as it happened, my daughter went screaming to the teacher and told her what had happened. Thankfully my daughter was fine, after a visit to the nurse’s office and an ice pack.
April 13, 2011 - 10:00pm
During the past two decades, reform-oriented Muslim women scholars, also known as Islamic feminists, started “speaking for themselves”. Their voices seek to correct the narrow representation of their struggle and craft a better understanding of how to engage in a two-front battle (against Islamic traditionalism and Western imperialism) and the difficulties they endure. Their fundamental questions about Islam and women may help in transforming Islamic laws and bringing about modern, egalitarian Muslim societies.
April 12, 2011 - 8:30pm
Recently, two events engendered some serious self-reflection on my “why I am in the teaching profession” question: two landmark sexual harassment cases against colleagues and the sudden death of a retired Political Science professor. They expose the lack of a clear sense of private/public boundaries among academics with respect to their students, and the good or evil that arises from it.
April 10, 2011 - 10:00pm
I am a full-time instructor. At my institution, this means that I have a heavier teaching load, but it also means that I have no service responsibilities whatsoever; no committees, no advising, no curriculum reform, no administrative duties, nothing. My department allows for me to participate in departmental committees and tries to ensure that we, the instructors, are properly represented, but at the end of the day, we are not required, nor do we receive any credit. In fact, our yearly evaluations are restricted to speaking about our teaching.
April 7, 2011 - 11:30pm
Very often over the last five years, my friends from the academia have kept me informed about their changes of affiliation, towns, countries and continents. The contracts for their projects are limited to a couple of months or years (in the happiest scenario), and in-between projects they are on high alert for securing their next professional step: tensed months of job hunting, preparations and hopes for interviews, documenting and writing new projects (at times in areas of research they are not familiar with, but with high chances to benefit from proper funding).

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