Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Monday, April 18, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Bonnie Yankaskas, an epidemiologist, have settled a dispute over the extent to which she was responsible for a security breach in a computer database used for her studies on breast cancer, The News & Observer reported. The university -- in an action that dismayed many researchers at Chapel Hill and elsewhere -- held Yankaskas responsible, and demoted her from full to associate professor. She and her supporters argued that she was being made a scapegoat. Under the settlement, she is returning to full professor and her full professor's salary, but will retire at the end of the year.

The joint statement on the settlement is as follows: "The university acknowledges that Dr. Yankaskas is an eminent researcher and a long-standing faculty member, and that she has made many contributions to the advancement of science and the improvement of health care for women concerned about or experiencing breast cancer.... The university also acknowledges that there was a communication breakdown, which hindered Dr. Yankaskas from learning that CMR had a vulnerable server. Dr. Yankaskas acknowledges that, as principal investigator of CMR, she had the responsibility for the scientific, fiscal and ethical conduct of the project, and responsibility to hire and supervise the CMR information technology staff who, with assistance as requested from School of Medicine and University information technology professionals, operate and maintain the CMR computer systems on which secure data are maintained."

Monday, April 18, 2011 - 3:00am

Governor Rick Perry, a Republican, has repeatedly denied that he is trying to influence the direction of Texas colleges in ways beyond the periodic proposals of new ideas or appointing board members. But The Houston Chronicle, based on public records requests for e-mail messages between the governor and university officials, reported that the governor has been pushing an agenda. Among the ideas he has promoted are measuring faculty members' "productivity" through course enrollments, and linking faculty compensation to student evaluations.

Monday, April 18, 2011 - 3:00am

The Jumbotron competition may be over. The latest must-have item for a big-time college football program is a statue, or statues, The Orlando Sentinel reported. The University of Florida, the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa and Auburn University have all recently unveiled statues of football greats (coaches and players). The article noted that these honors are not just coming at the end of careers, as might have been the case in the past.

Monday, April 18, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of San Francisco is being criticized for its decision to evict the Upward Bound program that has operated on its campus since 1966, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. The program provides college preparation services for low-income college students, and many advocates for the disadvantaged in the area are saying that the university is abandoning its Jesuit values by kicking out the program. University officials say that it's nothing against the program, but they need its space (and the space of other groups being asked to leave) for other purposes.

Monday, April 18, 2011 - 3:00am

"60 Minutes" on Sunday challenged the veracity of parts of Three Cups of Tea, a book that appears on numerous college syllabuses. The book, by Greg Mortenson, talks about his efforts to build schools for girls in Afghanistan and Pakistan -- and many colleges have assigned the book as a common text for all freshmen to read, making Mortenson a regular on the college lecture circuit. According to "60 Minutes," Mortenson's charity has claimed credit for creating schools that don't exist and his story about how he was inspired to this cause by getting lost on a mountain-climbing expedition is false. The Bozeman Daily Chronicle quoted Mortenson as defending the accuracy of his book and his foundation's efforts. But the article also said that he admitted that the story of how he got the idea was based on "a compressed version of events."

Monday, April 18, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, John Beckem of Empire State College explains how audio files are being used to improve communication between professors and distance learners. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, April 18, 2011 - 3:00am

Milton D. Glick, president of the University of Nevada at Reno, died suddenly Saturday night after suffering a stroke, The Reno Gazette-Journal reported. Glick had been president at Reno since 2006, and faced a series of deep budget cuts from the state, but still pushed for improvements in the student experience at the university. The university is currently facing a new round of cuts. Previously, he was provost at Arizona State University.

The Associated Students of the University of Nevada issued a statement Sunday night that said in part: "Dr. Glick was a great leader who never faltered to support student involvement in decision making at this university. Students will remember Dr. Glick as being a dedicated educator, leader and friend. His commitment to students was matched only by his kindness. His kindhearted nature brought students into his home to celebrate every December for a student holiday party. He was always willing to meet with students to hear our thoughts on issues facing the university and the community."

Monday, April 18, 2011 - 3:00am

Following storms that hit its campus Saturday, Shaw University announced that it was ending its semester immediately, The News & Observer of Raleigh reported. Students will be graded for the semester on the work they have done thus far. Several buildings were damaged on the campus, and 150 students have been displaced. Many institutions in the area lost power at least temporarily and warned students to stay inside during the storm.

Friday, April 15, 2011 - 3:00am

The April 2011 edition of The Pulse podcast features an interview with Ray Henderson, president of Blackboard Learn, talking about future directions for Blackboard's teaching and learning division and the key differences for faculty between Angel and Blackboard 9.1. Find out more about The Pulse here.

Friday, April 15, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Pepperdine University's Dyron Daughrity explores the cultural diversity of Christians around the world. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Pages

Back to Top