Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, November 9, 2010 - 3:00am

Officially, California has always denied that its public universities charge tuition -- admitting only to requiring "fees." Even though the fees are required, involve thousands of dollars, and support the operations of the universities -- much as is the case elsewhere -- Californians have refused to call them "tuition." But the California State University System announced this week that it would admit reality. An announcement from the system office said: "At this week's California State University Board of Trustees meeting, the trustees will review an agenda item that will inform them of the CSU's intention to change the terminology used to refer to certain charges assessed to students from 'fees' to 'tuition.' " The statement quoted Benjamin J. Quillian, the system's executive vice chancellor for business and finance, as saying that "the change in terminology from 'fees' to 'tuition' will allow us to more accurately define the expenses charged to students, while eliminating confusion and improving our efficiencies in regards to financial aid."

Tuesday, November 9, 2010 - 3:00am

Many times it falls to faculty members to question to relative support universities provide to athletics as opposed to academics. And faculty members at the University of Oregon have raised such questions. But over the weekend, the athletics director of the University of Washington raised those questions -- about Oregon. On a pregame radio show, Scott Woodward, the Washington athletics director, said that Oregon has become "an embarrassment" as an academic institution as its athletic success has come at the expense of academics, the Associated Press reported. On Monday, he apologized, saying that he respects Oregon and that it is "a great example of the struggles which can accompany a university when state funding decreases."

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

Harvard University has been engaged in a project to diversify the subjects of the many oil portraits that hang in libraries and various other public spaces at the university, The Boston Globe reported. A 2002 inventory found that of 750 such portraits, 690 were of white men, only two were of minority individuals, and the rest were of white women -- generally the wives of presidents, members of benefactors' families, or Radcliffe College professors. In recent years, 10 new portraits of minority individuals linked to Harvard have been added to the collection. The latest, unveiled Friday, is of Chester Pierce, a 1948 Harvard graduate who for many years was a professor of psychiatry and education and who is believed to have been the first black college student to play a football game at an all-white Southern university (the University of Virginia). A Globe slide show features some of the other portraits recently added to Harvard's collection.

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

Hundreds of climate scientists, organized in a new effort being announced today by the American Geophysical Union, are pledging to fight back against politicians who dispute established findings and who threaten scientists with politically motivated investigations, the Chicago Tribune reported. More than 700 researchers have agreed to participate in the campaign. "This group feels strongly that science and politics can't be divorced and that we need to take bold measures to not only communicate science but also to aggressively engage the denialists and politicians who attack climate science and its scientists," said Scott Mandia, professor of physical sciences at Suffolk County Community College in New York.

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

Ontario's government has announced a new program under which 75 top international doctoral students will receive full scholarships, with the government paying two-thirds of the costs and the universities picking up the rest, The Globe and Mail reported. The program is part of a larger campaign by Ontario political and academic leaders to attract more foreign students, especially those at the very top who are also recruited by American universities. But critics of the government, Maclean's reported, are questioning the strategy, charging that it is taking away money and spots from Canadian students.

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

The American Association of University Professors has written to George M. Philip, president of the State University of New York at Albany, urging him to reconsider plans to end all admissions to programs in French, Italian, Russian and classics. The letter notes the deep budget cuts faced at Albany and other SUNY campuses, but questions both whether these eliminations are necessary and whether faculty members were appropriately involved in the process to plan budget reductions. The letter endorses a view already expressed by faculty members there that eliminating these departments will erode the "core academic mission" of the university. The AAUP letter notes that the SUNY system is on the association's censure list for faculty layoffs in 1977. Those layoffs included an earlier round of language program eliminations at Albany, the AAUP recalls, adding: "Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose." A spokesman for Albany said via e-mail on Friday: "We received the letter today amd are reviewing it. We will respond to AAUP directly, as appropriate."

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

The University of Texas at Brownsville/Texas Southmost College, a joint campus located adjacent to the Mexican border, will reopen today, following its decision to close on Friday and over the weekend due to rising violence in Mexico. A notice posted on the institution's website stated that campus security officials would continue to monitor the situation.

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

Darrell G. Kirch, president of the Association of American Medical Colleges, on Sunday at the group's annual meeting called for a series of reforms of the institutions and the services they provide. While praising the health care reform law Congress passed, Kirch said that it should be viewed as "a crucial first step," and not a resolution of the problems facing American health care. He called on medical schools -- among other things -- to launch new ways to prepare people to lead their institutions, to be more open about medical education's finances and alternative approaches to them, and to redesign health care for the faculty and staff members, and their families, who work in academic medicine. "Data indicate that, despite our knowledge and experience, our faculty and staff members are not always wise consumers of heath care," Kirch said. "We often do not receive basic preventive services or good continuity of care, and too often we overuse tests and procedures despite the best medical evidence. Because many medical schools and teaching hospitals self-insure, they carry all the financial risk for their employees’ health status and health care. That presents an incredible opportunity. Rather than just being one more detached employer lamenting rising health care costs, academic medical centers in many cases are in the best position to improve the health of their faculty and staff."

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

A professor in Taiwan last week unveiled software that would allow universities to measure the impact that various university decisions would have on international rankings of universities, Times Higher Education reported. "We need a system to help us know what kind of strategy we can use to get on the [rankings] list," said the professor, Han-Lin Li, of National Chiao Tung University. Under the system, a university could measure the impact, for example, that recruiting a single Nobel laureate would have on the Shanghai Jiao Tong University rankings (which uses a methodology that includes the number of faculty Nobel laureates).

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

The president of the University of Notre Dame, the Rev. John I. Jenkins, on Friday issued a letter saying that the university was responsible for the death of Declan Sullivan, who was killed in an accident last month when the tower on which he was situated to film a football practice collapsed. "There is no greater sadness for a university community than the death of one of its students under any circumstances. Yet this loss is more devastating, for Declan died in a tragic accident while in our care," wrote Father Jenkins. "For that, I am profoundly sorry. We are conducting an investigation and we must be careful not to pre-judge its results, but I will say this: Declan Sullivan was entrusted to our care, and we failed to keep him safe. We at Notre Dame — and ultimately I, as president — are responsible. Words cannot express our sorrow to the Sullivan family and to all involved." Notre Dame has asked Peter Likins, former president of the University of Arizona, to conduct an independent review of the tragedy. Some have criticized Notre Dame's football coach, Brian Kelly, for holding practice outdoors on the windy day when Sullivan was killed. Father Jenkins, in his letter, backed the coach: "Coach Kelly was hired not only because of his football expertise, but because we believed his character and values accord with the highest standards of Notre Dame. All we have seen since he came to Notre Dame, and everything we have learned in our investigation to date, have confirmed that belief. For those reasons I am confident that Coach Kelly has a bright future leading our football program."

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