Higher Education Quick Takes

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Friday, May 7, 2010 - 3:00am

The U.S. Justice Department's Antitrust Division is investigating National Collegiate Athletic Association scholarship rules. While the Justice Department has not commented on the case, an NCAA statement confirmed the inquiry and said that it focused on rules requiring athletic scholarships to be awarded a year at a time and with a five-year limit. The NCAA said that it is "is working with Justice to help it understand" the rationales for the rules. Advocates for athletes' rights have pushed for multiyear scholarships as one way to bolster financial security for college athletes.

Friday, May 7, 2010 - 3:00am

As students leave their housing of the last academic year, many colleges encourage recycling of the possessions they are discarding. But the University of Colorado at Boulder is cracking down on one form of recycling -- dumpster diving. The Daily Camera reported that the university has been concerned about non-students visiting dumpsters this time of year, The university has placed "no trespassing" signs by the dumpsters, making it possible to prosecute those who come from off-campus to look for usable materials there.

Friday, May 7, 2010 - 3:00am

While several academic organizations have announced that they will stay away from Arizona because of the state's new immigration law, the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association is going ahead with its scheduled annual meeting this month in Tucson. The association has issued statements condemning the new law -- which many believe will encourage ethnic and racial profiling -- but also has reminded members that the organization is based at the University of Arizona and that moving a meeting at the last minute can have many consequences.

"Many of our members have written to us in support of this position, while many others have urged us to cancel the meeting or change venues. We appreciate the range of opinions expressed regarding what it means to hold our meeting in Arizona at this moment," said the statement. "As such, we request your support of our commitment to make this meeting a site of sincere and serious coalition-building and collective action. This desire to act responsibly as an organization within the state drives our decision. However, members also should be aware that cancelling our meeting in Tucson or changing venues would have immediate and dire consequences for the Association that so many have worked so hard to build: near-certain bankruptcy, a probable lawsuit from the hotel with which we have a signed contract, and as a result, disbandment. We are also mindful that, while some NAISA members are financially and organizationally in a position to change or cancel their bookings for travel to Arizona, and are certainly at liberty to do so, many members are not in a position to make such changes so close to the meeting without incurring tremendous personal expense."

Thursday, May 6, 2010 - 3:00am

Colorado State University on Wednesday rescinded its gun ban, citing a recent ruling by a Colorado court that invalidated a similar ban at the University of Colorado, the Associated Press reported. While advocates of the ban said it would promote safety, critics said that the university was exceeding its authority in an area in which the state has strict limits on the ability of agencies to regulate the carrying of guns.

Thursday, May 6, 2010 - 3:00am

The University of California at Berkeley, citing "genuine confusion" over when authorities ordered some protests to disperse in the fall, has dropped charges against dozens of students involved, and said it is reviewing some of its judicial rules, The New York Times reported. Students in the protests, with significant faculty backing, have criticized the university for restricting their right to protest.

Thursday, May 6, 2010 - 3:00am

Average tenured faculty salaries at the University of Toronto ($157,566) are the highest in Canada, according to new data from Statistics Canada, Canwest News Service reported. Fourteen universities now have average salaries for tenured faculty members that exceed $100,000.

Thursday, May 6, 2010 - 3:00am

Drake College of Business, a for-profit college, has announced that it will stop recruiting students in homeless shelters, Bloomberg reported. The news service exposed the practice, noting that many of those recruited borrow money to enroll, but don't advance very far in their programs, leaving the college with additional revenue and the homeless with debt.

Wednesday, May 5, 2010 - 3:00am

A federal judge has ordered a former professor who sued the University of Nevada at Reno, Hussein S. Hussein, and his former lawyer to pay the state $1.2 million for costs associated with lawsuits filed after Hussein lost his job, The Reno Gazette-Journal reported. The judge's ruling said: “Dr. Hussein should be required to pay defendants fees because he transformed what could have and should have been a straightforward employment matter into a full-scale assault against nearly everyone who crossed his path at the university." Hussein couldn't be reached for comment.

Wednesday, May 5, 2010 - 3:00am

Shari VanDelinder, the development director of Rocky Mountain College, has sued the institution and President Michael Mace, charging him with being a "violent, threatening boss who drove away employees and potential donors," The Billings Gazette reported. The suit claims that Mace screamed at VanDelinder for paying more attention to one donor than another at an event -- even as she explained to the president that she was focusing on the more generous donor. Board leaders said that they have investigated the complaints and are standing behind the president.

Wednesday, May 5, 2010 - 3:00am

Taiwan's universities are on the verge of accepting Chinese students, with an agreement by one political party to stop trying to block legislation that would allow their enrollment, The Taipei Times reported. The admission of the students -- to both undergraduate and graduate programs -- will not affect the number of slots available to Taiwanese students.

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